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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 29 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 16 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 14 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for J. E. Montgomery or search for J. E. Montgomery in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
n the 11th instant, I went in the Little Rebel in full view of the enemy's fleet, and saw the Carondelet [Cincinnati] sunk near the shore, and the Mound City sunk on the bar. The position occupied by the enemy's gunboats above Fort Pillow, offers more obstacles to our mode of attack than any between Cairo and New Orleans, but of this you may rest assured that they will never penetrate further down the Mississippi River. Our casualties were two killed and one wounded. [Signed.] J. E. Montgomery, Senior Captain Commanding, River Defence Fleet. On the Federal side there were only four wounded. Commander Stembel seriously, Fourth-Master Reynolds and two seamen slightly. This was a small list of casualties for such a desperate brush. and would seem to indicate rather indifferent gunnery practice on the part of the Federals, who, with their heavy ordnance, ought to have swept the enemy from the face of the water. as his vessels were of wood and lightly built. The attack
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
od effect. At this moment the ram fleet was several miles up the river, though coming down rapidly, and it was necessary for our gunboats to maneuver so as to enable it to overtake them. The Confederate vessels (still under the command of Montgomery) were the rams General Van Dorn, General Price, General Lovell, General Beauregard and General Jeff Thompson, mounting each four heavy guns; the General Bragg and General Sumter, mounting three guns, and the Little Rebel, mounting two guns. o have been successful beyond all hopes. The enemy was completely swept away, as if his vessels had been made of paper — a result which our officers had hardly expected since the gallant action at Plum Point, in which these same vessels, under Montgomery, proved such formidable foes. Rear-Admiral Davis had no military authority over the ram fleet. He could only request co-operation, which the Commander, Col. Ellet, was eager to give. The latter fought well, but unfortunately his vessels di