Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James Montgomery or search for James Montgomery in all documents.

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n and laws of the United States within that State, and absolved the citizens of Virginia from all obligation and obedience to them; and that if it be now rejected by the people, Virginia must change sides, and turn her arms against her Southern sisters. Moreover, that ordinance brought into Virginia several thousand soldiers of the Confederate army, and thus the faith of Virginia is pledged to it, for if it be rejected, their soldiers will merely have been entrapped.--(Doc. 170.) The Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser, of today, says that the various accounts about hundreds of letters of marque having been granted by the War Department of the Southern Confederacy, and that thousands of applications are already on file, is a gross error. Applications for that business are made to the collectors of the different ports, and not to the department at Montgomery, where none have been received. A number of applications have been made to the collectors of New Orleans, Mobile, and other South
e. The services were prefaced by the raising of the flag by Deacon Sill. (91 years of age) a colonel of the war of 1812, and the patriarch of the place. A prayer and addresses were then made by the Rev. Messrs. McCall, Loper and Gallup; the intervals being appropriately filled by national songs admirably given by a club from a neighboring village. In conclusion, the old men of the village were called upon, and short and telling speeches were made.--Boston Advertiser, May 21. The Montgomery (Ala.) Mail of to-day has the following paragraph in reference to Fort Pickens: Having returned this morning from Pensacola, where we have been for several days, we can assure our readers that the reports going to show that a battle will soon occur at Fort Pickens are mere conjectures. Of the plans of any of those in command nothing is known outside of Headquarters. Our own impression, formed while in Pensacola, is that there will be no battle at all at Pickens, or at least that it is no
around me in darkness and peril, having become diseased through confinement and want of proper food, I concluded that the best thing for them and the country would be to bring them North where they might recruit their strength so as to enter again those stirring scenes where soon every soldier will be needed. --National Intelligencer, June 15. In the Maryland Legislature in session at Frederick, Mr. McKaig presented a report from the Commissioners appointed by the Legislature to visit Montgomery. Accompanying this was a paper from Jefferson Davis expressing his gratification to hear that the State of Maryland was enlisted on the side of peace and reconciliation, and avowing his perfect willingness for a cessation of hostilities, and a readiness to receive any proposition for peace from the United States Government.--(Doc. 246.) Colonel Wallace, with his Indiana regiment, proceeded from Cumberland, Md., about forty miles into Virginia, to a place called Romney, where he surpr
of men fully armed, equipped, and ready for service.--N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, June 13. The Sixth Regiment N. Y. S. V., Colonel William Wilson's Zouaves, left New York for Fort Pickens. Previous to its departure the regiment was presented with a set of colors by the ladies of the Relief Committee.--(Doc. 249.) A portion of Montgomery's men, under Capt. Jamison, armed with Sharp's rifles and revolvers, reached Wyandotte, Kansas, from Lawrence under orders from Col. Mitchell. Montgomery, with several hundred mounted men, will at once take possession of the Kansas side of the Missouri line, so as to be ready to meet Gov. Jackson's forces whenever they make a movement from Independence towards Kansas City. The militia and volunteer companies are ready to march to the order, as soon as the orders are sent.--St. Louis Democrat, June 18. The largest meeting ever known in Dover, Delaware, was held there to-day. Chancellor Harrington presided. The following, among other
be with us, when these abolition cities shall receive the especial attention of the gallant avengers of Southern wrongs. In Confederate Congress in session at Richmond, Va., a resolution of thanks to Ben McCulloch and his forces, was introduced by Mr. Ochiltree of Texas, and passed unanimously.--(Doc. 205.) This day a very large and beautiful flag was presented to the battalion of Pennsylvania troops stationed at Annapolis Junction, Md., by the Union ladies of Prince George's and Montgomery counties. The ceremonies were very interesting. James Creigh, Esq., made the presentation speech, and Capt. McPherson the reception speech. A large number of persons were present.--Washington Star, August 23. William F. Barry, chief of artillery in Gen. McClellan's staff, yesterday was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers.--Philadelphia Press, August 22. The Twenty-third Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, under the command of Col. David B. Birney, numbering about five h
ndred rebels under Gen. Rains approached Fort Scott and seized eighty mules belonging to the United States, killing the teamster. A messenger was despatched to Montgomery, who had five hundred men. He pursued Rains eleven miles, killing several of his men, when, coming on the main body of the enemy, a battle commenced, the rebels having cannon, and Montgomery one howitzer only. The fight lasted two hours, when Montgomery slowly retreated, keeping up a running fight until nightfall.--N. Y. World, September 17. Jeff. Thompson at Camp Hunter, Mo., issued a proclamation, in which, as a retaliative measure for Fremont's proclamation, he threatened, for eMontgomery slowly retreated, keeping up a running fight until nightfall.--N. Y. World, September 17. Jeff. Thompson at Camp Hunter, Mo., issued a proclamation, in which, as a retaliative measure for Fremont's proclamation, he threatened, for every Southern soldier and citizen executed, to hang, draw, and quarter a minion of Abraham Lincoln.--(Doc. 24.) The Louisville (Ky.) Journal of this morning, strongly condemns the proclamation of Gen. Fremont, and urges the State Legislature by its action to avoid the contingency of any such action here. It says the Legislat
September 17. A fight took place at Mariatown, Mo., between six hundred Federals under Colonels Montgomery and Johnson and four hundred rebels, in which the latter were completely routed with a loss of seven killed, and one hundred horses and all their tents and supplies captured. The Nationals lost two privates killed and six wounded. Col. Johnson, while riding at the head of his command, was pierced by nine balls and instantly killed. Three bullets took effect in his head, two buck-shot in the neck, one bullet in the left shoulder, one in the left thigh, one in the right hand, and one in the left. He died, urging his men to fight for the Stars and Stripes.--Buffalo Courier, September 23. The Legislature of Maryland was prevented from organizing at Frederick by the arrest of its clerk and several of the members. During the evening the Union members of the House and Senate met in caucus and resolved that, the action of the Senators present in not assembling having virt
k their place in line.--Baltimore American, Sept. 28. A battle was fought near Shanghai, in Benton County, Missouri, between a body of Kansas troops, under Montgomery and Jamison, and the advance guard of Ben. McCulloch's army and some of the State Guard, under Judge Cheneault. The rebels were driven back with considerable lome of the State Guard, under Judge Cheneault. The rebels were driven back with considerable loss, and pursued forty miles, when Montgomery fell back on Greenfield. Great alarm was felt by the rebels in Springfield lest Montgomery should attack that place, and the troops there rested on their arms for several nights.--(Doc. 75.)ome of the State Guard, under Judge Cheneault. The rebels were driven back with considerable loss, and pursued forty miles, when Montgomery fell back on Greenfield. Great alarm was felt by the rebels in Springfield lest Montgomery should attack that place, and the troops there rested on their arms for several nights.--(Doc. 75.)
October 13. Eighteen miles northeast of Lebanon, Missouri, near the Wet Glaze, Major Wright, with two companies of United States cavalry, routed about three hundred mounted rebels. The rebels were gathered on the side of a hill, drawn up in line, with the road in front, and the summit of the hill behind them. Here they remained an hour and a half, evidently awaiting the approach along the road of a Union force, when suddenly two companies of Federal cavalry, under command of Captains Montgomery and Switzler, led by Major Wright, advanced over the brow of the hill, in the rear of the rebels, and plunging forward to within one hundred paces, delivered a murderous volley, which scattered the rebels like chaff before the wind. They fled precipitately up the ravine, toward Lebanon, tearing through the brush, in a perfect rout. A number of saddles were emptied, and horses were galloping riderless about the field. They were taken so completely by surprise that they had hardly
ition of a few designing men, are but admonished by the sad condition of such brethren, of the fatal results sure to follow from the course which they have pursued, and are more and more convinced of the obligation, alike of interest and of duty, to abide, with undying attachment, to the Union devised for us by our fathers, as absolutely necessary to our social and political happiness, and the preservation of the very liberty which they fought and bled to achieve for us. This night Capt. Montgomery, of Wright's battalion, with his company, was surprised at Keittsville, Barry Co., Mo., by eight hundred and fifty rebels, supposed to belong to McBride's division, but who represented themselves as Texas Rangers. They fired into the house occupied by the National troops, killing two and wounding one. One of the rebels was killed, the rest fled, taking with them about seventy horses. Two wagons, loaded with sutler's stores, were burned at Major Harbine's farm, two miles beyond Keitt
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