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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John B. Montgomery or search for John B. Montgomery in all documents.

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-friends and the surgeon had pushed on between the wagons toward the field; the distant firing bad ceased; the wagons quietly stood still; so T------and I passed up through the regiment, which they told us was the First or Second New Jersey, Col. Montgomery, from the camp at Vienna; and we sat down comfortably near a house at the top of the hill and waited to see what next! In less than twenty minutes the road was cleared and regulated; the army wagons halted, still in line, on one side of thehey attacked the hospital, and the retreat commenced, they heard a cannon-ball whistle over their heads, which, I infer, contributed in a slight degree to an acceleration of their movements. They say they were at the place in the road when Colonel Montgomery (as I see it was by the papers) made that famous halt! of the light brigade, (Russell and Company,) soon after it occurred, and they stopped there, procuring tea and a lodging at a house near by. They started on their return tramp at about
nt's artillerists across the road and repulsed all who attempted to break through. I particularly request attention to the service thus rendered by this loyal young officer. While he was thus engaged, a courier arrived with the news that Col. Montgomery was advancing with a New Jersey brigade from Falls Church, and that the retreat must be stopped, only the wagons being allowed to pass through. Some thousands of the soldiery had already got far on their way to Washington. Poor fellows! who could blame them? Their own colonels had deserted them, only leaving orders for them to reach Arlington Heights as soon as they could. A few miles further I met Montgomery swiftly pressing to the rescue, and reported the success of Lieut. Brisbane's efforts. And so I rode along, as well as my weary horse could carry me, past groups of strangling fugitives, to Fairfax, where Col. Woodbury was expecting, and guarding against, a flank movement of the enemy, and on again to Long Bridge and the
mond City. 4. Roger A. Pryor, of Petersburg. 5. Thomas S. B. Cook, of Appomatox. 6. W. C. Rives, of Albemarle. 7. Robert E. Scott, of Fauquier. 8. James M. Mason, of Frederick. 9. John W. Brockenbaugh, of Brockenridge. 10. Charles W. Russell, of Wheeling. 11. Robert Johnson, of Harrison. 12. Walter Staples, of Montgomery. 13. Walter Preston, of Washington. State at Large — James A. Seddon, of Goochland; W. B. Preston, of Montgomery.--Baltimore American, June 27. mond City. 4. Roger A. Pryor, of Petersburg. 5. Thomas S. B. Cook, of Appomatox. 6. W. C. Rives, of Albemarle. 7. Robert E. Scott, of Fauquier. 8. James M. Mason, of Frederick. 9. John W. Brockenbaugh, of Brockenridge. 10. Charles W. Russell, of Wheeling. 11. Robert Johnson, of Harrison. 12. Walter Staples, of Montgomery. 13. Walter Preston, of Washington. State at Large — James A. Seddon, of Goochland; W. B. Preston, of Montgomery.--Baltimore American, June
er Ward the Navy has lost a brave officer, who has enriched it by military and scientific contributions, served it faithfully in varied spheres, and promised much for it in future. The squadron in the Pacific, under the command of Flag-Officer John B. Montgomery, consists of 6 vessels, 82 guns, and 1,000 men. The West India squadron is under the command of Flag-Officer G. J. Pendergrast, who has been temporarily on duty, with his flag-ship, the Cumberland, at Norfolk and Hampton Roads, sist official intelligence received by the Department from the Levant was a communication from Commander Hunt, dated Hilo, Sept. 3, 1860. He expected to take his departure in a short time for Panama. Not arriving at that port by January, Flag-Officer Montgomery despatched the steamers Saranac and Wyoming in search of her. The latter visited the Sandwich Islands and various localities on the route, making every possible inquiry for her. But no tidings of her were obtained, although it was defini
as to instruct the sons, and the above incident in the battle of Bunker Hill may now, for that purpose, be put to good use. Even the heroes of Bunker Hill, it seems, had among them a portion of the same leaven which worked so malignantly at Bull Run. About the whole early history of the Revolutionary War is a series of disasters, interspersed with a few splendid successes. One of these last was the capture of Montreal and the occupation of nearly the whole of Canada by the forces under Montgomery and Arnold. But this success was only short-lived. Sullivan, though sent with large reinforcements, and aided by the intrepid valor of Wayne, found it impossible to hold the province against the superior force which the opening of the spring enabled the British to throw into the St. Lawrence, and the American army retreated out of Canada, in the emphatic words of John Adams, disgraced, defeated, discontented, dispirited, diseased, undisciplined, eaten up with vermin, no clothes, beds, bl
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-General McClellan's command. (search)
Doc. 121.-General McClellan's command. The following general order defines the extent of General McClellan's new command: war Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, July 25, 1861. First--There will be added to the Department of the Shenandoah the counties of Washington, Alleghany, in Maryland, and such other parts of Virginia as may be covered by the army in its operations. And there will be added to the Department of Washington the counties of Prince George, Montgomery, and Frederick. The remainder of Maryland, and all of Pennsylvania and Delaware, will constitute the Department of Pennsylvania, Headquarters Baltimore. The Department of Washington and the Department of Northeastern Virginia will constitute a geographical division under Major-General McClellan, United States Army, Headquarters Washington. Second--All officers of volunteer regiments will be subject to examination by a Military Board, to be appointed by this department with the concurrence
th the distinguished Senator from Kentucky in the dislike expressed by him to a change in the form of our Government. He seemed to be apprehensive of a dictatorship. He feared there might be a change in the nature and character of our institutions. I could, if I chose, refer to many proofs to establish the fact that there has been a design to change the nature of our Government. I could refer to Mr. Rhett; I could refer to Mr. Inglis; I could refer to various others to prove this. The Montgomery Daily Advertiser, one of the organs of the so-called Southern Confederacy, says: Has it been a precipitate revolution? It has not. With coolness and deliberation the subject has been thought of for forty years; for ten years it has been the all-absorbing theme in political circles. From Maine to Mexico all the different phases and forms of the question have been presented to the people, until nothing else was thought of, nothing else spoken of, and nothing else taught in many of t
heir batteries with great ability, and did much execution. For those officers and men who were particularly conspicuous, I will refer the Department to the reports of the different commanders. To my personal staff I am much indebted for the coolness and rapidity with which they carried orders about the field, and would call particular attention to my volunteer aids, Capt. Bledsoe, Messrs. Armstrong, Ben Johnston, (whose horse was killed under him,) Hamilton Pike, and Major King. To Major Montgomery, quartermaster, I am also indebted for much service as an aid during the battle; he was of much use to me. To Col. McIntosh, at one time at the head of his regiment, and at other times in his capacity of adjutant-general, I cannot give too much praise. Wherever the balls flew thickest he was gallantly leading different regiments into action, and his presence gave confidence everywhere. I have the honor to be, sir, Your obedient servant, Ben McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commandin
heir batteries with great ability, and did much execution. For those officers and men who were particularly conspicuous, I will refer the Department to the reports of the different commanders. To my personal staff I am much indebted for the coolness and rapidity with which they carried orders about the field, and would call particular attention to my volunteer aids, Capt. Bledsoe, Messrs. Armstrong, Ben Johnston, (whose horse was killed under him,) Hamilton Pike, and Major King. To Major Montgomery, quartermaster, I am also indebted for much service as an aid during the battle; he was of much use to me. To Col. McIntosh, at one time at the head of his regiment, and at other times in his capacity of adjutant-general, I cannot give too much praise. Wherever the balls flew thickest he was gallantly leading different regiments into action, and his presence gave confidence everywhere. I have the honor to be, sir, Your obedient servant, Ben McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commandin