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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William J. Montgomery or search for William J. Montgomery in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lane's Corps of sharpshooters. (search)
McLaurin. Quartermaster.—A. D. Cazaux. Commissaries.—Duncan McNeill, Robert Tait. Surgeons.—James A. Miller, John Tazwell Tyler, Thomas B. Lane. Assistant Surgeons.—Charles Lecesne, William Brower, Alexander Gordon, Simpson Russ. Chaplain.—Colin Shaw. Twenty-eighth North Carolina Regiment. Colonels.—James H. Lane, Sam D. Lowe. Lieutenant-Colonels.—Thomas L. Lowe, Sam D. Lowe, William D. Barringer, William H. A. Speer. Majors.—Richard E. Reeves, Sam D. Lowe, Wm. J. Montgomery, William D. Barringer, William H. A. Speer, Samuel N. Stowe. Adjutants.—Duncan A. McRae, Romulus S. Folger. Quartermasters.—George S. Thompson, Durant A. Parker. Commissary.—Nicholas Gibbon. Surgeons.—Robert Gibbon, W. W. Gaither. Assistant Surgeons.—F. N. Luckey, R. G. Barham, Thomas B. Lane, N. L. Mayo. Chaplains.—Oscar J. Brent, F. Milton Kennedy, D. S. Henkel. Thirty-Third North Carolina Regiment. Colonels.—L. O'B. Branch, Clark M. Ave
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
legation are wax in his hands. I am much afraid of the result. I struggled hard this morning to place in the Constitution a provision which would stop Sunday mails but failed. His work in the Presidential Congress having been concluded, Mr. Cobb returned to his home in Athens, Georgia. The capture of Fort Sumter, the wild excitement which followed the organization of volunteers and preparations for war filled the interval until the re-assembling of Congress at Montgomery in April. Montgomery, April 19, 1861.—The atmosphere of this place is positively tainted with selfish ambitious schemes for personal aggrandisement. I see it, hear it, feel it, and am disgusted with it. But I would rather tell you of my journey here. At Maxey's, George Lumpkin's company was drawn up, and would have a speech from me. At Union Point we met the Young Guards, and again I had to make a little speech. At Greensboro Oscar Dawson told me he had raised in two days a company of eighty men, and they