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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 21 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 15, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Moody or search for Moody in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 168.-the burning of Hampton, Va. August 7-8, 1861. (search)
same for winter-quarters. Mr. Wilson Jones, an old and gray-headed gentleman, and his wife, (Unionists,) the coroner of Hampton, Mr. Kennon Whiting and lady, and several other prominent citizens of Hampton, are at Old Point, under the protection of the old flag they were born under, being kindly cared for by Major-General Butler. The village is a complete wreck; every house is gutted with the exception of about five at the north and south end of the town, which are the residences of Mr. Moody, the sutler at the fort; Miss Eliza Jones, (a brick building;) the Episcopal parsonage; the house of Joseph Phillips, H. Clay Whiting's store and warehouse, and one or two small frame houses on the outskirts. The reason of these being spared was that the rebels had no time to prosecute their hellish work further, being closely pressed by Colonel Weber's men, and the wind blowing southwest swept through the middle of the town, leaving these buildings untouched. Mr. Scofield was endeav
ned, induced me, on Sunday, the 4th inst., to put the Missouri forces under the direction, for the time being, of Gen. McCulloch, who accordingly assumed the command in chief of the combined armies. A little after midnight we took up the line of march, leaving our baggage trains, and expecting to find the enemy near the scene of the late skirmish; but we found, as we advanced, that they were retreating rapidly toward Springfield. We followed them hastily about 17 miles, to a place known as Moody's Spring, where we were compelled to halt our forces, who were already nearly exhausted by the intense heat of the weather and the dustiness of the roads. Early the next morning we moved forward to Wilson's Creek, ten miles southwest of Springfield, where we encamped. Our forces were here put in readiness to meet the enemy, who were posted at Springfield, to the number of about ten thousand. It was finally decided to march against them; and on Friday afternoon orders were issued to mar
ned, induced me, on Sunday, the 4th inst., to put the Missouri forces under the direction, for the time being, of Gen. McCulloch, who accordingly assumed the command in chief of the combined armies. A little after midnight we took up the line of march, leaving our baggage trains, and expecting to find the enemy near the scene of the late skirmish; but we found, as we advanced, that they were retreating rapidly toward Springfield. We followed them hastily about 17 miles, to a place known as Moody's Spring, where we were compelled to halt our forces, who were already nearly exhausted by the intense heat of the weather and the dustiness of the roads. Early the next morning we moved forward to Wilson's Creek, ten miles southwest of Springfield, where we encamped. Our forces were here put in readiness to meet the enemy, who were posted at Springfield, to the number of about ten thousand. It was finally decided to march against them; and on Friday afternoon orders were issued to mar