Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Moore or search for Moore in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
were performed by every Confederate gunboat engaged in the battle. Commander Kennon, of the Governor Moore, in his duel with the Varuna, fired through the bows of his own ship. On board the McRea, aenshaw; Manassas, Lieutenant A. F. Warley, and ten launches. There were two State gunboats: Governor Moore, two guns, Lieutenant Beverly Kennon, and Governor Quitman, two guns, Captain Alexander Graneet the Confederate fleet. The Varuna, fired upon and rammed by the Louisiana State gunboat Governor Moore and River Defense ram Stonewall Jackson, was forced to run into shoal water where she promptp and received the surrender of the Confederate Commander Kennon and the crew of the burning Governor Moore. As the Brooklyn came through the opening in the barrier, she ran afoul of the little Kinvessels the battle became dispersed into single actions like that between the Varuna and the Governor Moore, the Iroquois and the McRae, when the latter was driven off and her commander killed, but be