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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Cleon Moore or search for Cleon Moore in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
every seven of all her troops present, while the loss in the rest of the army was little more than one in every seven. But the losses of South Carolina were not to be counted by numbers only. Her best blood was poured out on that rocky bed at Manassas. In our brigade that distinguished citizen and soldier, Colonel J. Foster Marshall, and Lieutenant-Colonel D. A. Leadbetter, were killed. In Jenkins's brigade Colonel Thomas J. Glover, one of the most promising sons of the State, and Colonel Moore, of the Second Rifles, fell, doing their duty nobly. In Evans's brigade our loss in killed was still heavier. At the head of the Seventeenth regiment fell one who had been an honored governor of the State, whose advanced years did not warrant his service in the field, but whose devotion to the State revived the energy of his youth, and with Governor Means fell also his son, Major Robt S. Means. Colonel J. M. Gadberry, of the Eighteenth Regiment, and Lieutenant-Colonel T. C. Watkins, of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and the Monitor—Report of the Committee on Naval Affairs. (search)
hurried below the guns of Fortress Monroe and the Rip-Raps. The Merrimac pursued at full speed, until she came well under the fire of the latter fort, when she returned to her moorings at the mouth of the river. After the evacuation of Norfolk the Merrimac was taken above Craney Island and blown up, on the 11th of May. * * * She (the Monitor) had refused the gage of battle offered her by the Merrimac daily since the 11th of April. Statement of A. B. Smith, pilot of the Cumberland. (Moore's Rebellion Record, volume 4, page 273.) The crew of the Monitor say the balls rattled and rang upon both vessels, and seemed to bound off harmless—so far as is known neither vessel is damaged. The Merrimac is probably not injured, at least, more than the starting of a plate or so of her iron covering; and her machinery being uninjured, she is probably fit to come out again. It is impossible to keep the Merrimac from coming out. It is impossible to board the Merrimac. * * * General Woo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Sixth South Carolina at seven Pines. (search)
the authorities there to remain with me during our captivity. Our loss in killed and wounded in this action was really two hundred and sixty-eight out of the five hundred and twenty-one officers and men carried into the battle. Of this large number time will not allow a detailed statement. Among the killed were those noble heroes, Captains Phinney, Lyles, Walker and Gaston. Among the wounded were your Colonel, and those gallant officers, Captain White and Lieutenants McFadden, Wylie, Moore, J. M. Brice and McAlilly. Twenty years have passed since the war made its last rugged track over these quiet fields, and the actors in its scenes are fast passing away. A few years ago tidings of the death of our own grand old Commander, General Lee, sped from hamlet to hamlet, and a wail swept over the length and breadth of our Southland, which was not without response from the North. But the other day the great champion of the Union, General Grant, laid himself down to die, and passe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official reports of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
own with the rifle guns of Captains Maurin and Moore, and report to General Imboden for duty with hturned over the command of my artillery to Captain Moore and at once hastened to overtake General Iw Sergeant Cleary, by whom I sent word to Captain Moore that I had not been able up to that time te General Imboden, but that I desired him (Captain Moore) to join the wagon train and move forward I obeyed, and, on returning to camp, found Captain Moore with his two guns, the caissons having beeably abandoned. I lost no time in placing Captain Moore's battery in position, and had just done sposition, and this had just been done when Captain Moore opened upon a battery of the enemy's guns,nition was exhausted, when I first ordered Captain Moore and then Lieutenant Landry to retire; thisy command were but slight in this battle. Captain Moore had four men wounded and two horses killednd two horses killed. From the reports of Captain Moore and Lieutenant Landry, I believe that the [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 20 (search)
noose was adjusted, he said, Be quick. (Signed) John Avis. Charlestown, W. Va., April 25th, 1882. State of West Virginia,Ss.: County of Jefferson, I, Cleon Moore, a Notary Public in and for the county of Jefferson, State aforesaid, hereby certify that John Avis, whose name is signed to the foregoing affidavit, this day p contained in said affidavit are true, to the best of his knowledge and belief. Given under my hand and notarial seal, at Charlestown, West Virginia, this 25th day of April, 1882. (Signed) Cleon Moore, Notary Public. Note.—Mr. Cleon Moore's certificate above is stamped with his public official seal. A. C. Hopkins. s contained in said affidavit are true, to the best of his knowledge and belief. Given under my hand and notarial seal, at Charlestown, West Virginia, this 25th day of April, 1882. (Signed) Cleon Moore, Notary Public. Note.—Mr. Cleon Moore's certificate above is stamped with his public official seal. A. C. Hopki
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The affair at Frederick city. (search)
over guns and horses, it is all a mistake, and will be denied by that gallant regiment, which earned too much honor and glory to claim what does not belong to them. Lieutenant Gehan, if there was any such person, did not lead the fight, nor to my knowledge, follow it. If there were any members of the Second South Carolina engaged in that dash, they did not legitimately belong there, but had straggled to the front, as our gallant boys had a habit of doing. Lieutenant Gordon captured Colonel Moore, of Ohio (commander of the advance), and his coal-black steed, but, as the brigade of infantry were firing upon us, he gathered what men he could find in the confusion and confronted the infantry brigade in order to retard them and allow us to reap the harvest of our charge in arms, equipments and prisoners. We retreated with our prisoners under fire of a brigade, by orders from General Hampton, through his gallant son Preston, who was afterwards killed, that we were being flanked. T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The opening of the lower Mississippi in April, 1862-a reply to Admiral Porter. (search)
ese necessarily illy constructed, illy armed and provided, and incomplete substitutes for vessels of war, went out to fight, and did fight, each, as it came up, one of the most powerful naval fleets that this country ever fitted out, with all the improvements and facilities that human ingenuity, money, and fine machine shops and dockyards could supply. And no one, with the heart of a brave man beating in his breast, can truthfully reflect upon their courage. The converted propeller, Governor Moore, which was so efficiently and heroically fought by her brave commander, Beverley Kennon, was not of Commodore Mitchell's command, nor were the river steamers intended for co-operation. When Farragut's fleet passed up it left below Forts Jackson and St. Philip, under General Duncan, and the still helpless Louisiana, under Commodore Mitchell, with a river steamer as a tender, the Landis, alongside, which was entirely unarmed. The Louisiana had used her guns against all of the Federal f