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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. F. Moore or search for J. F. Moore in all documents.

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stronger position, and this they had fortified; and when the rebel Colonel Patten arrived, he stated that he could with his regiment, the Twenty-second, hold it against the whole of Averill's brigade; but, poor fellow, he was wofully mistaken. When the brigade arrived at Hillsborough, a village three miles from the top of the mountain, Keeper's battery was sent to the left, supported by the Fourteenth Pennsylvania; while the Tenth Virginia, Colonel Harris, and the Twenty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Moore, (German regiment,) were sent to the right, to endeavor to turn the rebel position. Next to the Twenty-eighth was the Third Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Thompson; then the Second Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Scott; and the Eighth Virginia, Colonel Oley. These were all old veterans, that had been trained in the valley and Eastern Virginia, under Milroy, Cluseret, and Bohlen. The skirmishers moved off in splendid style, with the supporting line close behind them, and in a very short tim
army. We found on our arrival large quantities of forage and flour. What was not required by the wants of the service was either sent to the rear or burned. Our wounded were as promptly and as well cared for as circumstances would permit. Surgeon Moore, Medical Director of the army of the Tennessee, voluntarily left his chief to devote himself to their relief, and under his active, skilful, and humane auspices, and those of the medical directors with the divisions, they were comfortably remving Shell Mound, the One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois, the Eighty-fourth Indiana, and the Fifth Indiana battery were detailed to defend the works erected at that place for the protection of our supply train. They were under the command of Colonel Moore of the One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois. This duty was well performed. Six regiments, (the Eighth Kentucky, Colonel Sydney M. Barnes; the Ninety-sixth Illinois, Colonel Thomas E. Champion; the Thirty-fifth Indiana, Colonel Mullen; the F
we intercepted Mudwall Jackson's train, that was on its way from Huntersville to Warm Springs, to get out of reach of Colonel Moore. The train was guarded by two companies of Jackson's ragged chivalry, and loaded with clothing, shoes, and ammunitiohich we destroyed. We arrived at Callaghan's at four o'clock, where we heard of the operations of General Duffie and Colonel Moore, and the retreat of Echols. We marched out on the Sweet Springs road, and encamped for the night on Dunlap's Creek. nt with his battalion to blockade the Huntersville road, but found that Jackson had done it effectually, from fear of Colonel Moore; so, after the most comfortable night's rest that we had enjoyed during our retreat, and paying a visit to our woundes time our stock of coffee was exhausted. We reached the mouth of Elkwater at noon, where we met a supply-train from Colonel Moore, with the wished — for crackers, and with our crackers and coffee forgot, in a measure, the hardships of the expediti
rving on the committee, and W. L. Otie was elected to fill his place. While the Committee were in consultation, the Chair invited a free and open expression of opinion from the citizens present, whereupon R. P. Sutton, Esq., H. P. Coolidge, J. F. Moore, and Colonel Noble were severally called upon, and entertained the audience with brief and pertinent remarks. Mr. Hanks, from the Committee, reported a series of resolutions, as did also Major Jackson. On motion of J. A. Butler, it was osound and convincing logic. After which the resolutions were adopted unanimously. On motion of Mr. Morse, Mr. Butler was requested to furnish a copy of his speech for publication, which he kindly consented to do. Upon the nomination of Colonel Moore, Rev. J. A. Butler, J. M. Hanks, Esq., J. B. Miles, and Hon. Josiah McKiel were elected delegates to the Convention to be held at Little Rock on the eighth instant, with power to fill vacancies. Upon its being suggested that Judge McKiel w
Plains, East-Tennessee, January 19. Wood's division of Granger's corps drove the rebel cavalry out of Dandridge January fifteenth; Sheridan's division came up the sixteenth. There was sharp skirmishing the evening of the sixteenth, but the enemy was driven back. There was a tough fight Sunday, lasting from three o'clock P. M. till dark. La Grange's brigade of cavalry, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth, Ninety-third, and First Ohio infantry--One Hundred and Twenty-fifth commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Moore, Ninety-third and First by the major of the Ninety-third--were the forces chiefly engaged on our part. The infantry regiments were on picket; and the forces in the order from left to right as named above. In addition to this a section of a battery was posted on a hill in rear of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth. The rebels came on in strong force, five to one. The cavalry videttes were soon driven in; then the infantry outposts, supported by the outpost reserves, were hotly en
d's brigade and Smith's battery on the Roundtop, and hold the line from thence to Birney's left, (First division, Third corps.) Strange to say, this movement was not promptly carried out, and there was imminent danger of losing the Roundtop, for Longstreet was making desperate exertions to carry it. Fearing this result, Sickles sent orders to General Crawford, of the Fifth corps, to reenforce Ward's brigade, but he declined to move without orders from his own corps commander, Sykes; but Captain Moore, of Sickles's staff, at length overcame his scruples, and he reached the disputed point just in time to prevent its falling into the enemy's hands. Considering our force unequal to the exigency, Sickles called on the heroic troops of the Second corps for support, and they gave it with a will. The struggle now became deadly. The columns of Longstreet charged with reckless fury upon our troops; but they were met with a valor and stern fortitude that defied their utmost efforts. An alar
ultimately overtook us. The fight was by no means a trivial encounter; it was a battle hotly contested, fought at close range, face to face and foot to foot. The commanding officers of the various regiments are entitled to unlimited credit for the heroic manner in which they led their men. At the acme of the battle, Colonel Sammons, of the One Hundred and Fifteenth New-York, was struck in the foot, and was in consequence compelled to leave the field. His horse was shot from under him. Colonel Moore, of the Forty-seventh New-York, was also wounded, a ball striking his hand and passing out at the elbow. Colonel Barton had his coat pierced in several places and his horse shot. Colonel Henry had three horses shot, but himself escaped in a most miraculous manner. Provost-Marshal General Hall had a horse shot from under him, and as for himself, no one would believe it would be possible for him to again pass through what he did on that day, and come out unscathed. Lieutenant Jackson,
el Lynch, Second brigade, Third division, Sixteenth army corps, consisting of the Fifty-eighth and One Hundred and Nineteenth Illinois regiments, and Eighty-ninth Indiana, with the First Vermont battery, of the Nineteenth army corps. Centre--Colonel Moore's First brigade, comprising the Forty-ninth and One Hundred and Seventeenth Illinois regiments, with the One Hundred and Seventy eighth New-York, while immediately in their rear, for support, the Third Indiana battery was masked, with the Forwbold, of the Fourteenth Iowa, Sixteenth army corps; Colonel Mix, of the----New-York cavalry, Nineteenth army corps, both of whom sacrificed their lives in defence of their country's honor; Colonel Lynch, Second brigade, Sixteenth army corps; Colonel Moore, First brigade, First division, Sixteenth army corps; Colonel Hill,----brigade, First division, Sixteenth army corps, all deserve the highest praise. In fact, though the results were very unfavorable to our cause, yet in the battle of Pleasa