hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 3 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Auttose, battle of. (search)
Auttose, battle of. Late in November, 1813, the Creek country was invaded by troops from Georgia. A cry for help from the settlers along the Creeks had come to the ears of the Georgians, when Gen. John Floyd, at the head of 950 militia of that State and 450 friendly Indians, guided by Mordecai, a Jew trader, entered the region of the hostiles from the east. Crossing the Chattahoochee, he pushed on towards the Tallapoosa, where he was informed that a large number of hostile Indians had gatliered at the village of Auttose. on the Holy ground, on which the prophets had made the barbarians believe no white man could set foot and live. It was on the left bank of the Tallapoosa, about 20 miles above its confluence with the Coosa. Floyd encamped unobserved near the town on the evening of Nov. 28, and at dawn he appeared before the village with his troops arrayed for battle in three columns. He also had two or three field-pieces. There were two towns, one below the other. The town
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Liberty, song of (search)
ur grandsires, bless'd heroes, we'll give them a tear, Nor sully their honors by stooping to fear; Through deaths and through dangers their Trophies they won, We dare be their Rivals, nor will be outdone. In Freedom we're born, etc. Let tyrants and minions presume to despise, Encroach on our rights, and make freedom their prize; The fruits of their rapine they never shall keep, Though vengeance may nod, yet how short is her sleep. In Freedom we're born, etc. The tree which proud Haman for Mordecai rear'd Stands recorded, that virtue endanger'd is spared; The rogues, whom no bounds and no laws can restrain, Must be stripp'd of their honors and humbled again. In Freedom we're born, etc. Fac-Simile of the Music of the “song of liberty.” Our wives and our babes, still protected, shall know Those who dare to be free shall forever be so; On these arms and these hearts they may safely rely, For in freedom we'll live, or like Heroes we'll die. In Freedom we're born, etc. Ye insolent Ty
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McClellan, George Brinton 1826-1885 (search)
st Point, and his Manual, translated from the French, became the text-book of the service. In 1852 he was engaged with Capt. Randolph B. Marcy (afterwards his father-in-law) and Gen. C. F. Smith in explorations and surveys of Red River, the harbors of Texas, and the western part of a proposed route for a Pacific railway; also mountain ranges and the most direct route to Puget's Sound. He was next sent on a secret mission to Santo Domingo; and in 1855 he was sent with Majors Delafield and Mordecai to Europe to study the organization of European armies and observe the war in the Crimea. Captain McClellan left the army in 1857 and engaged in civil engineering and as superintendent of railroads. He was residing in Ohio when the Civil War broke out, and was commissioned major-general of Ohio volunteers by the governor. He took command of all the troops in the Department of the Ohio; and after a brief and successful campaign in western Virginia, was appointed to the command of the Nati
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mordecai, Alfred 1804-1887 (search)
Mordecai, Alfred 1804-1887 Military officer; born in Warrenton, N. C., Jan. 3, 1804; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1823; promoted captain of ordnance in 1832; became a member of the ordnance hoard in 1839; was appointed assistant inspector of arsenals in 1842; and resigned from the Army May 5, 1861. His publications include Digest of military laws; Ordnance manual for the use of officers in the United States army; Reports of experiments on gunpowder; and Artillery for the United States land service, as devised and arranged by the ordnance board. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1887.
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 7: at West Point as instructor, 1857-61; the outbreak of the Civil War (search)
mer vacation of 1859, extending from the middle of June to August 28th, I made quite a tour northward for recreation. First, with my family, I visited my friend, Lieutenant C. C. Lee, at Watervliet Arsenal, and there I met the venerable Major Alfred Mordecai and his family. Mordecai loved the Union, but, being from North Carolina, he concluded that he would not fight in a civil war, and so early in 1861 tendered his resignation. His son Alfred is now a brigadier general on the retired list.Mordecai loved the Union, but, being from North Carolina, he concluded that he would not fight in a civil war, and so early in 1861 tendered his resignation. His son Alfred is now a brigadier general on the retired list. He has had an honorable and useful life in the army, always on active duty in the Ordnance Department, and very successful in his profession. From Watervliet we passed on to Niagara Falls. On this journey I was attacked with rheumatism, which bowed me down, gave much pain, and made all who saw me think I was hopelessly disabled, yet for the sake of those with me I would not interrupt the journey. We went forward by way of Lake Ontario and down the St. Lawrence, stopping at Montreal to t
. B., I, 580. Monmouth Academy, I, 17, 23. Moody, D. L., I, 501; II, 558, 560, 561, 564, 570. Moody, Will, II, 560-562. Moore, Aaron, II, 387. Moore, Alexander, I, 368. Moore, Edward, II, 334. Moore, Elizabeth, I, 10. Mordecai, Alfred, I, 97. Mordecai, Alfred, Jr., I, 97. Morestadt, Frau, II, 531. Morgan, Edwin D., I, 138. Morgan, James D., I, 585; II, 17, 20, 24, 25, 146. Morgan, Thomas J., I, 515, 522. Morrill, Lot M., II, 266. Morris, F. B., II, 39Mordecai, Alfred, Jr., I, 97. Morestadt, Frau, II, 531. Morgan, Edwin D., I, 138. Morgan, James D., I, 585; II, 17, 20, 24, 25, 146. Morgan, Thomas J., I, 515, 522. Morrill, Lot M., II, 266. Morris, F. B., II, 395, 396. Morris, W. W., I, 77, 78. Morris, Mrs. W. W., I, 77, 78. Morrow, Henry A., I, 350. Mortie, Louise de, II, 261. Morton, Levi P., II, 496, 542. Mosby, John S., I, 391. Mower, Joseph A., II, 107-110, 134, 149, 150, 342. Moy-Yu-Ling, II, 478, 479. Mulliken, Charles H., I, 69. Munroe, John, I, 78, 79. Murray, Ben, I, 10. Murray,EllenandTwoSisters, 11,98. Naglee, H. M., I, 229, 232. Napoleon, Prince, Jerome, I, 169. Nasby, Petroleum V. (Mr. Locke), I