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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
15th and 16th, in the face of dreadful weather and terrible roads, the divisions of Franklin, Porter, and Smith were advanced to White House, and a depot established. On the 18th the Fifth and Sixth Corps were formed, so that the organization of the Army of the Potomac was now as follows: Second Corps, Sumner — Divisions, Sedgwick and Richardson; Third Corps, Heintzelman — Divisions, Kearny and Hooker; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions, Couch and Casey; Fifth Corps, F. J. Porter — Divisions, Morell and Sykes and the Reserve Artillery; Sixth Corps, Franklin — Divisions, Smith and Slocum. The cavalry organization remained unchanged, and we were sadly deficient in that important arm, as many of the regiments belonging to the Army of the Potomac were among those which had been retained near Washington. The question now arose as to the line of operations to be followed: that of the James on the one hand, and, on the other, the line from White House as a base, crossing the upper Chi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
, Col. Theodore F. Lehmann. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 2; m, 121==124. Artillery.: H, 1st N. Y., Lieut. Charles E. Mink; 7th N. Y., Capt. Peter C. Regan. reserve artillery, Maj. Robert M. West: 8th N. Y., Capt. Butler Fitch; E, 1st Pa., Capt. Theodore Miller; II, 1st Pa., Capt. James Brady; M, 5th U. S., Capt. James McKnight. Fifth Corps, Brig.-Gen. Fitz John Porter. Staff loss: m, 1. Cavalry: 8th Ill., Col. John F. Farnsworth. Loss: k, 3; w, 9; m, 3==15. first division, Brig.-Gen. George W. Morell. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John H. Martindale: 2d Me., Col. Charles W. Roberts; 18th Mass. (detached with Stoneman's command), Col. James Barnes; 22d Mass., Col. Jesse A. Gove (k), Maj. William S. Tilton (w and c), Capt. Walter S. Sampson, Capt. D. K. Wardwell; 1st Mich., Col. Horace S. Roberts; 13th N. Y., Col. Elisha G. Marshall, Maj. Francis A. Schoeffel; 25th N. Y., Maj. Edwin S. Gilbert (c), Captain Shepard Gleason; 2d Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Lieut. Charles D. Stiles. Bri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
, and Fremont, could not be suddenly thrown upon our flank and rear nor otherwise strengthen the enemy in Richmond. I was allowed to adopt my own plans, and to select such additional forces as I deemed necessary. At 4 A. M. on the 27th General G. W. Morell, commanding the division consisting of J. H. Martindale's, Daniel Butterfield's, and James McQuade's brigades, marched from New Bridge preceded by an advance-guard of two regiments of cavalry and a battery of artillery under command of Gene so fully absorbed the attention of the foe that our purpose The battle of Gaines's Mill. From a photograph of the painting by the Prince De Joinville, 1862, made from personal observation: persons represented: 1. Gen. F. J. Porter; 2. Gen. G. W. Morell; 3. Gen. George G. Meade (on horseback in the distance), and the following aides-de-camp; 4, Comte De Paris; 5. Colonel Radowitz; 6. Major Hammerstein; 7. Duc De Chartres; 8. Captain Mason. The view is from the left of the Federal positi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.47 (search)
On the Confederate right at Gaines's Mill. this description of the fighting in front of Morell's line is from an extended paper on the fight for Richmond in 1862, which appeared in the Southern bivouac for April, 1887.--Editors. by E. M. Law, Major-General, C. S. A. By 5 o'clock on the 27th of June the battle of Gaines's Mill was in full progress all along the line. Longstreet's and A. P. Hill's men were attacking in the most determined manner, but were met with a courage as obstinate as their own by the Federals who held the works. After each bloody repulse the Confederates only waited long enough to re-form their shattered lines or to bring up their supports, when they would again return to the assault. Besides the terrific fire in front, a battery of heavy guns on the south side of the Chickahominy was in full play upon their right flank. There was no opportunity for manoeuvring or flank attacks, as was the case with D. H. Hill on our extreme left. The enemy was direct
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
Island Bridge the day before by Warren's brigade, with the aid of the gun-boats. The main fighting was in the space between the words Confederate and Union, together with one or two assaults upon the west side of the Crew Hill from the meadow. Morell's and Couch's divisions formed the first Union line, and General Porter's batteries extended from the Crew house to the West house. man. Rodes being sick, his brigade was commanded by that peerless soldier, Colonel J. B. Gordon. Ripley, Garlander from General Lee, and we were then beaten. The Comte de Paris, who was on McClellan's staff, gives this account of the charge of my gallant division: Hill advanced alone against the Federal positions. . . . He had therefore before him Morell's right, Couch's division, reenforced by Caldwells brigade, . . and finally the left of Kearny. The woods skirting the foot of Malvern Hill had hitherto protected the Confederates, Willis's Church, on the Quaker road, near Glendale. Used as a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
Crew (sometimes called the Mellert) house. Morell, prolonging Sykes's line on Crew's Hill, with n's brigade. All were supporting batteries of Morell's division, commanded by Captain Weeden and oton Warren and Sykes and on the extreme left of Morell, causing a few casualties in Morell's divisionMorell's division. In return for this intrusion the concentrated rapid fire of the artillery was opened upon them, she dividing point between Couch's division and Morell's line, the artillery fronting the fence and bntiring foe. Attacks by brigade were made upon Morell, both on his left front and on his right, and ed at our batteries; but the artillery of both Morell and Couch mowed them down with shrapnel, grapeing page. From a photograph taken in 1885. Morell's line extended from the Crew house on the rigfew to escape their fire. Colonel McQuade, on Morell's left, with the 14th New York, against orderso remain inactive under a damaging fire. As Morell's front ranks became thinned out and the ammun[11 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
ward the Upper Rappahannock to connect with Reno, his advance under Morell, on the 24th, found Reno and Reynolds gone; no troops of General Poat Warrenton Junction by eleven o'clock on the morning of the 27th, Morell's division of the same corps arriving later in the same day. I sning of the 27th. Sykes's division of his corps was encamped near; Morell's was expected in a few hours. I had seen General Porter at West P1 o'clock on the morning of the 27th, and had been in camp all day. Morell's division arrived later in the day at Warrenton Junction, and woul Griffin's brigade. Griffin testified that he was ordered by General Morell to follow Sykes, who was supposed to have gone to Centreville. at Centreville during the day. With this straggling brigade was General Morell, commander of the division to which it belonged. This brigadm the battle these two officers, with true soldierly spirit, passed Morell and brought their commands to the field and into the battle, where
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
iam J. Sewell; 6th N. J., Col. Gershom Mott (w), Lieut.-Col. George C. Burling; 7th N. J., Col. Joseph W. Revere; 8th N. J., Lieut.-Col. William Ward (w), Capt. John Tuite (k), Capt. George Hoffman, Capt. Oliver S. Johnson, Capt. Daniel Blauvelt, Jr.; 115th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Robert Thompson. Brigade loss: k, 48; w, 238; m, 107 = 393. Unattached: 6th Me. Battery, Capt. Freeman McGilvery. Loss; k, 4; w, 9; i, 5 == 18. Fifth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Fitz-John Porter. first division, Maj.-Gen. George W. Morell. First Brigade, Col. Charles W. Roberts: 2d Me., Maj. Daniel F. Sargent; 18th Mass., Capt. Stephen Thomas, Maj. Joseph Hayes; 22d Mass. (not in action), Capt. Mason W. Burt; 13th N. Y., Col. Elisha G. Marshall; 25th N. Y., Col. Charles A. Johnson; 1st Mich., Col. Horace S. Roberts (k), Capt. Emery W. Belton. Brigade loss: k, 103; w, 374; in, 99 = 576. Second Brigade (not in action), Brig.-Gen. Charles Griffin: 9th Mass., Col. Patrick R. Guiney; 32d Mass., Col. Francis J. Parker;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Washington under Banks. (search)
s, of Colonel R. O. Tyler, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, the artillerists were instructed in their duties, and with the approval of the Government a permanent garrison was provided, formed of those splendid regiments of heavy artillery, each of twelve large companies, afterward known as the heavies of Grant's Virginia campaigns. In the last three weeks of September there were sent to the Army of the Potomac in the field 36,000 men, in October, 29,000; in all, 65,000. Porter's corps (Morell and Humphreys), 15,.500; 20 new regiments in a body, 18,500; Stoneman and Whipple, 15,000; together, 49,000; add convalescents and stragglers, 16,000.--R. B. I. Frequent reconnoissances to the gaps of the Blue Ridge and to the Rapidan served to disturb the Confederate communications a little, to save us from needless alarums and excursions, and incidentally to throw some strange lights on the dark ways of the Secret Service, whose reports we thus learned to believe in if possible less th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
Shaler; 67th N. Y., Col. Julius W. Adams; 122d N. Y., Col. Silas Titus; 23d Pa., Col. Thomas X-I. Neill; 61st Pa., Col. George C. Spear; 82d Pa., Col. David H., Williams. Brigade loss: Antietam (Sept. 18th), w, 9. Artillery: 3d N. Y., Capt. William Stuart; C, 1st Pa., Capt. Jeremiah McCarthy; D, 1st Pa., Capt. Michael Hall; G, 2d U. S., Lieut. J. H. Butler. Fifth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Fitz John Porter. Escort: Detachment 1st Me. Cav., Capt. George J. Summat. first division, Maj.-Gen. George W. Morell. First Brigade, Col. James Barnes: 2d Me., Col. Charles W. Roberts; 18th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Joseph Hayes; 22d Mass., Lieut.-Col. William, S. Tilton; 1st Mich., Capt. Emory W. Belton; 13th N. Y., Col. Elisha G. Marshall; 25th N. Y., Col. Charles A. Johnson; 118th Pa., Col. Charles M. Prevost; 2d Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Capt. Lewis E. Wentworth. Brigade loss: Shepherdstown, k, 66; w, 125; m, 130 == 321. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles Griffin: 2d D. C., Col. Charles M. Alexande
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