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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. 8 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. 4 0 Browse Search
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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., An eighteenth century enterprise. (search)
e canal went into operation a steamboat was successfully operated upon the Connecticut river, and its owner and inventor was interviewed by Fulton, who, it seems, only made successful application of the inventions of John Fitch in Delaware and Samuel Morey in New Hampshire, assisted by the wealth of Livingston. Morey, to his dying day, complained bitterly of their treatment of him, saying that the cusses had stolen his invention. Not despairing, however, he invented a new form of engine, for wMorey, to his dying day, complained bitterly of their treatment of him, saying that the cusses had stolen his invention. Not despairing, however, he invented a new form of engine, for which he secured a patent. This was acquired by Sullivan, after his experience with a heavy engine from Philadelphia, which he wrote had a damaging effect upon the boats used upon the canal. Full of hope, Mr. Sullivan purchased the shops and water privilege at Medford, now within the bounds of Winchester. These were located on the Aberjona river opposite the present Parkway and just below the present Wedgemere station. He then entered upon the manufacture of steam engines, to use upon the c
se. He already had some unsatisfactory experience with a heavy engine from Philadelphia and had acquired the patent of Samuel Morey's revolving engine. It was one of this type that propelled this third Massachusetts steamboat through Medford at a tivice was established in Boston harbor or but one steamboat had ever been seen there. It is also interesting to note that Morey's patent was signed by the first president, George Washington. A model of Morey's first engine is now at the UniversitMorey's first engine is now at the University of Vermont at Burlington. In the absence of drawings or illustrations it is difficult to explain its operation, but Morey's engine successfully propelled a boat against the current of the Connecticut near his home, fourteen years before Fulton (wMorey's engine successfully propelled a boat against the current of the Connecticut near his home, fourteen years before Fulton (who had invented no engine) made continuously successful use of steam as motive power on the Hudson. There is a certain fascination in the gleaming steel and rhythmic stroke of a modern steamboat engine; but here was one of a century long gone, wh