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The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ent--General William Preston. Vice-Presidents--James O. Harrison, J. Stoddard Johnston, General John S. Williams, General Basil W. Duke and General Joseph Lewis. Secretary — James A. Headly. Treasurer--Major R. S. Bullock. Executive Committee--Prof. J. D. Pickett, Colonel W. C. P. Breckinridge, Major H. B. McClellan, J. R. Morton, Esq.; Major John R. Viley, J. Soule Smith, Esq.; F. K. Hunt, Esq.; Major P. P. Johnston, Major B. G. Thomas, J. P. Metcalf, Esq.; G. W. Ranck, Esq.; Colonel C. C. Morgan, Lee Bradley, Esq., and James A. Grinstead, Esq. The following plan of organization was adopted: This Society shall be known as the Kentucky branch of the Southern Historical Society, and its object is to collect for the archives of the Parent Society such historical material relating to the Confederate war as can be secured in the State of Kentucky. It shall be located at Lexington, Kentucky, and shall hold meetings at least once each year. Membership in the Parent Societ
forever free. For the welfare of his sister and other relatives he also offered up a feeling prayer, and concluded by praying for the President and all those in authority under him. Condition of affairs in the West. [From the New York World, July 1.] The military situation at the West is not what it should be. Gen. Curtis is retreating, with a prospect that he will lose his army and leave Missouri undefended. Gen. Mitchell is retiring before the Confederates in Tennessee, and Gen. Morgan is marching in the opposite direction from Knoxville. Confederate armies are turning up in every direction, and our forces are nowhere as strong as they should be. The Confederate conscription act, which went into operation in February last, has produced its fruit in filling the Confederate rank and file with men of a more determined stamp than the volunteers. It is noticeable that the Confederates who fought at Shiloh and Fair Oaks are not the same troops who behaved so ignobly at Roan
self along with the loyal cities of the Union. Gen. Butler Stands by the profession. C. C. Morgan, who is an attorney-at-law, was brought before the Commanding General, charged by Mrs. Monroeving attempted to extort money from her. It was shown that Mrs. Monroe called at the office of Mr. Morgan to secure his services in getting the Mayor released from Fort Jackson. Mr. Morgan agreed to uMr. Morgan agreed to undertake the case for $2,000, of which $1,000 was to be paid as a retainer. It is alleged that Mrs. Monroe, being instigated by outside parties, made the charge against Morgan of attempting to extortMorgan of attempting to extort money.--The General held that, as an attorney-at-law, Mr. Morgan had a right to demand what fee he pleased, and that, as an honest man and a loyal citizen, he should be protected. The charge was dishe General held that, as an attorney-at-law, Mr. Morgan had a right to demand what fee he pleased, and that, as an honest man and a loyal citizen, he should be protected. The charge was dismissed.