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day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the late bloodless victory.--one of many. Several companies of the Third and Fourth Regiments of Georgia passed through Augusta for the expected scene of warfare — Virginia. Sixteen well-drilled companies of volunteers and one negro company, from Nashville, Tennessee, offered their services to the Confederate States.--Charleston Mercury, April 30. At New Orleans, La., the steamships Texas, Tennessee, and the G. W. Hewes, the property of Charles Morgan, Esq., were taken possession of by order of Gov. Moore. Captain Warren of the steam-tug Tuscarora, who was arrested on the charge of having furnished information to the captain of the Daniel Webster, which caused him to leave this port, was released on giving bonds of two thousand dollars for his future loyal conduct. It is ascertained that the blame rests less upon him than upon the owners of the above-named steamers.--New Orleans Delta, April 30. A military review took place at N
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 27: the Gettysburg Campaign. (search)
ned in good season, as the Assembly was sounded from division headquarters. The crowd, however, advanced in spite of the cannon but fortunately these were not fired and before the men arrived at the tent they were induced by their officers to give up their plan and return to their camp. The corps to which these men belonged left during the night and there was no further trouble. While on duty at the Gap, Col. Devereux was kept in the position of General Officer of the Day, and as Col. Charles Morgan, Hancock's chief of staff, was an old schoolmate, the two were much together. While on a scouting trip to the top of the Blue Ridge, the two officers, through glasses, witnessed the fight at Aldie Gap, where Stewart was put to flight by Pleasanton. While the corps were halted at Thoroughfare Gap, it was necessary to have a picket line all around it, different regiments being selected each day. The corps was continually harassed, particularly at night, by Mosby's guerillas. Becaus
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
Moran, John, priv., (F), Aug. 27, ‘61; 21; disch. Oct. 25, ‘62 to enlist in U. S.A. 4th Batt. Morgan, Benj. E., priv., (A), July 26, ‘61; 18; disch. disa. June 9, ‘62. Morgan, Francis, priv., (DMorgan, Francis, priv., (D), Aug. 13, ‘64; 22; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Morgan, George, priv., (D), May 26, ‘64; 22; sub. C. A. Hemminway; abs. pris. June 22, ‘62 to Mar. 15, ‘65; disch. July 18, ‘65. Morgan, Geo. P. priv., (—)Morgan, George, priv., (D), May 26, ‘64; 22; sub. C. A. Hemminway; abs. pris. June 22, ‘62 to Mar. 15, ‘65; disch. July 18, ‘65. Morgan, Geo. P. priv., (—), Jan. 25, ‘64; 18; rejected Jan. 26, ‘64. Morgan, Patrick, priv., (C), June 5, ‘65; 26; deserted Mar. 28, ‘65 from Picket Post near Hecker's Run, Va. Morin, Alexander, priv., (F), Aug. 5, ‘61; 21; kMorgan, Geo. P. priv., (—), Jan. 25, ‘64; 18; rejected Jan. 26, ‘64. Morgan, Patrick, priv., (C), June 5, ‘65; 26; deserted Mar. 28, ‘65 from Picket Post near Hecker's Run, Va. Morin, Alexander, priv., (F), Aug. 5, ‘61; 21; killed in action, June 30, ‘62, Glendale, Va. Morrill, Edward W., priv., (C), Aug. 20, ‘61; 33; wounded Sept. 17, ‘62; disch. disa. Mar. 20 ‘63, at Boston, by Col. Day. Morrill, Estwick E., priv., (—Morgan, Patrick, priv., (C), June 5, ‘65; 26; deserted Mar. 28, ‘65 from Picket Post near Hecker's Run, Va. Morin, Alexander, priv., (F), Aug. 5, ‘61; 21; killed in action, June 30, ‘62, Glendale, Va. Morrill, Edward W., priv., (C), Aug. 20, ‘61; 33; wounded Sept. 17, ‘62; disch. disa. Mar. 20 ‘63, at Boston, by Col. Day. Morrill, Estwick E., priv., (—), Aug. 7, ‘61; 27; see Co. D, 17th Mass.; N. R. Morrll, Henry S., corp., (F), July 25, ‘61; 18; dropped Oct. 13, ‘62; su
.......................................... 289 Moore, James B.,............................................ 192, 201 Monihan, John,...................................................... 323 Monnehan, Patrick,................................................... 107 Monocacy Junction, Md.,.......................................... 217, 222 Moran, John,......................................................... 193 Morgan, Col. Charles,............................................... 215 Morgan, Benjamin E. (A),.............................................. 61 Morin, Alex,......................................................... 106 Morrill's Brigade,.................................... 57 Morrill, Edward W.,.................................................. 144 Morrison, Joseph W.,.................................................. 186 Morrison, Nahum,.................................................... 286 Morrisville, Va.,................................... 257, 258, 26
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company B. (search)
pt. 29, 1863, Port Hudson, La. James McLAUGHLIN, Boston, 21, s; shoemaker. Dec. 1, 1863. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. John McQUEENEY, Lawrence, 30, m; laborer. Aug. 11, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. William Merrill, 42, m; carpenter, Aug. 18, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Dean R. Martin, Newburyport, 38, m; trader. Nov. 9, 1863. Killed in action April 8, 1864, at Sabine Cross Roads, La. Prior serv. Samuel S. Morey, Lawrence, 36, m; miller. Jan. 4, 1864. Disch. Aug. 1, 1865. Charles Morgan, Farley, Vt. En. Worcester, 22, s; farmer. Nov. 5, 1863, M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Prior serv. John P. Morgan, Lawrence; 23, s; farmer. Sept. 11, 1862. Disch. disa. Oct. 28, 1863. John Moriarty, Jr, Lawrence, 18, s; operative. Aug. 15, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Hiram S. Morrison, Lawrence, 33, m; mason. Aug. 16, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. John Mulcare, Lawrence, 18, a; operative, Aug. 9, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Lawrence Murphy, Boston, 22, s; hostler. July 19, 1
week. During the session one hundred and fourteen Secessionists were indicted. The present population of Charleston, S. C., is 48,160. As many as 5,000 are absent from the city, owing to the war and other causes. Lewis P. Fiery, of Washington county, Md., declines the appointment of Major of the 1st Regiment of the Potomac Home Guards. Crittenden Coleman, a grandson of Senator Crittenden, died at Pensacola recently. He was a private in a Florida company. On Sunday, the 25th of August, a new Lutheran Church was dedicated in Woodsboro,' Frederick county, Md. A salute was fired at Albany, N. Y., on Monday, by order of Gov. Morgan, in honor of the victory of Cape Hatteras. Philip Wingert and Joseph Arnold, two old citizens of Hagerstown, Md., died last week. Jacob Aims, President of the Butchers' and Drevers' Bank, New York, died last Monday at an advanced age. John Cohagen, who died in Alexandria recently, was the oldest citizen of that place.
Mayors Court, Saturday. --Charles Morgan and Lewis Smith were severally arraigned upon the charge of being drunk and lying in public places. Both were discharges.--William O. Callahan, for being drunk and interrupting persons on the streets, was committed to jail.--M. A. Chambers, who escaped from jail yesterday, was returned thither.--John Callahan, for assault and battery upon Daniel Collius, was sent to jail.--John T. Smith and Charles Riddell were brought up on the serious charge of feloniously stealing a horse and buggy of the value of $150, belonging to Davis & Hutcheson. The property was, when stolen, in the possession of John H. Slater, who drove to Vauxhall's Island Friday evening about nine o'clock, and left the buggy standing near the door of a house into which he went and got supper. When he returned to look for it, it was missing. About 11o'clock the same evening, he found it in the possession of the defendants and a third person, which last escaped. The case wa
British papers. --A young man, called Andrew Taylor, alias Sim, alias Charles Morgan, was arrested by officer Kelly and brought before the Mayor yesterday, to answer the charge of being a deserter from the gunboat Raleigh. The prisoner had British protection papers, but admitted that he had been on the Raleigh, and had left without permission. He was handed over to the Naval authorities for a further hearing.