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William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 5: (search)
roops and officers he reported at the time as having done his hardest fighting, and accomplished every thing it was possible to perform. The reports of these division commanders, whom he then commended, in turn relieve the brigade officers he now abuses from the blame he attempts to fix upon them, and show that the conduct of Generals Morgan, DeCourcey, and Thayer, and the fighting of their troops were such as should have commanded high praise, even from General Sherman. Immediately after this action General George Morgan was assigned to an equal command with General Sherman, namely, that of the First Corps, Army of the Mississippi, Sherman taking the Second Corps, while General McClernand succeeded him in command of the army. It would be difficult to find material for more severe criticisms of the statements made in the Memoirs, concerning the failure at Chickasaw Bayou, than is contained in this report of Sherman's, written when the facts were vividly present to his mind.
h about 1711, is enlarged and garrisoned......1756 British flag raised over Fort Chartres......Oct. 10, 1765 Colonel Wilkins, sent to Fort Chartres to govern the Illinois country, assumes by proclamation the civil administration, appointing seven magistrates or judges......Nov. 21, 1768 First court held in Illinois opens at Fort Chartres......Dec. 6, 1768 Land grant of 30,000 acres in the present county of Randolph made by Colonel Wilkins to John Baynton, Samuel Wharton, and George Morgan, merchants of Philadelphia......April 12, 1769 A freshet destroying a part of Fort Chartres, it is abandoned by the British garrison, who occupy Fort Gage, opposite Kaskaskia, and fix the government there......1772 Deed to the Illinois Land Company from the chiefs of Indian tribes in Illinois for two immense tracts of land in southern Illinois, bought July 5, recorded at Kaskaskia......Sept. 2, 1773 American expedition under George Rogers Clarke conquers Illinois without bloodsh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Indiana, (search)
age of military bill ......1863 John P. Usher appointed Secretary of the Interior......Jan. 8, 1863 Second Kentucky Cavalry, Confederate, Captain Hines, cross the Ohio at Flint Rock, and are captured......June 16, 1863 Confederates under Morgan cross the Ohio at Brandenburg, Ky., July 8, pursued by Federals under General Hobson. They move eastward, covering 700 miles in twenty days (Morgan's raid)......July, 1863 Hugh McCulloch appointed Secretary of the Treasury......March 7, 1865 Morgan's raid)......July, 1863 Hugh McCulloch appointed Secretary of the Treasury......March 7, 1865 Law making colored people competent witnesses......1865 Convention of colored citizens of Indiana at Indianapolis to devise means to obtain full citizenship......Nov. 6, 1866 National convention of the Grand Army of the Republic held at Indianapolis......Nov. 20, 1866 Governor Morton resigns, being elected United States Senator, and is succeeded by Lieut.-Gov. Conrad Baker......January, 1867 Legislature ratifies the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution......Jan. 29, 1867 Ro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
dians who, led by British, intended a general attack on the settlement, but were repulsed......May 26, 1780 Leyba removed and Francisco Crozat reinstated. Under his government St. Louis was regularly fortified......1780 Old St. Genevieve, which tradition says was founded by settlers from Kaskaskia in 1735, is destroyed by a flood, the inhabitants remove from river bottoms to the present site......1785 New Madrid, settled as early as 1780, is laid out on an extensive scale by Col. George Morgan, of New Jersey, who had received a grant of over 12,000,000 acres of land from Spain......1788 Crozat succeeded by Don Manuel Perez as commandant-general of the post of St. Louis......1788 Zenon Trudeau succeeds Perez......1793 Daniel Boone, of Kentucky, moves to what is now St. Charles county......1795 Trudeau succeeded by Charles Dehault Delassus de Delusiere......1798 Delassus appoints Daniel Boone commandant or syndic of the Femme Osage district......1800 Maj. Amo
Fife-Major, Samuel E. Catlin. line.--Company A--Thomas M. Davies, Captain; George H. Cone, Lieutenant; R. D. Crocker, Ensign. Company B--Wm. P. Brazee, Captain; Rufus Dugget, Lieutenant; Geo. T. Hallingworth, Ensign. Company C--Fred. Harrer, Captain; Joseph Smith, Lieutenant; Wm. Rantenberg, Ensign. Company D--Wm. L. Cowan, Captain; Robert H. Foote, Lieutenant; George E. Lee, Ensign. Company E--Lewis Michael, Captain; Alfred Sears, Lieutenant; William War, Ensign. Company F--Chas. A. Muller, Captain; Wm. A. Rowan, Lieutenant; Dilos Craymer, Ensign. Company G--J. Babcock, Captain; Seth L. Wadworth, Lieutenant; John Stryker, Jr., Ensign. Company H--Samuel E. Thompson, Captain; Henry Goss, Lieutenant; Geo. Morgan, Ensign. Company I--Horace B. Lake, Captain; Geo. W. Bartlett, Lieutenant; Sterling W. Hazen, Ensign. Company K--Wm. H. Seymour, Captain; Leman Bradley, Lieutenant; Fayette Butler, Ensign. Among the officers and soldiers there are several naturalized Welshmen.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
ng of her legislature, Virginia promptly instructed her delegates to execute to the United States a deed of cession conforming to the amendments proposed by Congress. This deed was accordingly executed by her delegates and accepted by Congress, March 1, 1784, New Jersey alone voting against acceptance; Maryland, Georgia and New York being absent, South Carolina divided; all the other States voting for it. The acceptance of the deed met with petty opposition from a peculiar source. Mr. George Morgan, the agent of the Indiana Land company, who had all along been besieging Congress, now appeared in a new role. He filed a petition in the name of the State of New Jersey, as its agent, praying Congress to take jurisdiction under the ninth article of Confederation and try the case as between two states. He recites that a hearing had been obtained before a very respectable committee of Congress, alluding to the report of November 3, 1781, and presents his credentials as agent of New Je
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
ame illustrious in naval story. Early and Breckinridge entered Maryland, defeated Wallace at Monocacy on July 9, 1864, and formed line in sight of the national Capitol to the consternation of the administration. Admiral Farragut steamed into Mobile Bay with his fleet the first week of August, captured the Confederate ship Tennessee, drove the other vessels up the river and reduced the forts but failed to take the city. Meanwhile Forrest in June put Sturgis to rout at Tishomingo Creek and Morgan re-entered Kentucky, while Price again marched into Missouri. Altogether the Confederacy was showing a wonderful amount of energy in the employment of its daily lessening resources. Mr. Lincoln felt and expressed in August his discouragement on account of the failure to secure any decided victories, and especially that Richmond was so successfully defended. He then turned for consolation to further enrollment of the negro slaves, and in his August interview with Judge Mills, of Wisconsin,
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
reached the Tennessee at Mussel Shoals. To gain time to cross he led in person a fierce charge upon the enemy, and successful in this, was the last man to cross the river, under the terrific fire of the Federal advance. In conveying his thanks for this brilliant service General Bragg authorized Wheeler to designate officers for promotion, two to major-general and four to brigadier-general. The appointments he recommended were made by telegraph, and among them was that of General, now Senator Morgan, of Alabama Subsequently General Wheeler with his cavalry led the advance of Longstreet against Knoxville, defeating Burnside's cavalry, and capturing trains, batteries and nearly a thousand prisoners, and then being recalled to Bragg's assistance, gallantly defended the rear of the Confederate army on November 26th, and co-operating with General Cleburne on the next day at Ringgold Gap, put a final check to Grant's pursuit. During 1864, throughout the operations of J. E. Johnston and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Personal reminiscences of the last days of Lee and his Paladins. (search)
olored church in this place for many years. On the hills beyond Farmville, there seemed to be a great deal of artillery halted, or parked, as I afterwards learned, and it was here (we know now, that which few knew then), that General Lee opened his first correspondence with Grant in reference to the surrender of the army; and it was a short distance further on that they seemed to be lightening the load of head-quarter's wagons by destroying letters and papers from them. A young man named Morgan, from this city, who had belonged to the 12th Virginia, but who had been detailed as clerk in the medical department of General Lee's headquarters, seemed entrusted with this duty. Here, for the last time, I saw Dr. Guild, General Lee's medical director, and Mrs. Guild, who was trying to make her escape with the army into friendly lines, and General Lee's carriage and horses, which I never saw him use, though I was told that he did ride in the carriage once or twice during the retreat. It
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
Robert F. Henry, E. Winston. Harvey, Mike. Helms,—— Hundley, Charley, wounded in the head at Cedarville. Johnson, John S., from Greenbrier county, W. Va. Kent, Clarence Polk, from Wytheville, Va. Wounded in 1865. Kent, Edwin Dallas, from Wytheville, Va. Wounded in 1865. Lewis, Dr. Granville R. Lewis, William B. Lawson, George W. Lacy, Dr. Horace P. Morton, Clement R., Third Lieutenant. Morton, Henry O., Corporal. Moore, Thomas J., First Sergeant. Morgan, L. Dennis, First Sergeant. Marshall, Hunter H., Jr., killed at Amelia Courthouse, 1865. Marshall, John. Morris, Macon C., wounded at Appomattox Courthouse, April, 1865. Marshall, John P., died from effects of cannon shot. Marshall, Joel W., Lieutenant and Adjutant of 14th Virginia Cavalry. Marshall, Ben W. Marshall, Joel F. Morton, David H. McGhee, William. McCargo, Samuel, killed at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Moseley, J. B. Morton, John J. Welton, F.
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