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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 12 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 66 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 65 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 35 5 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 32 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
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Ohio, Eleventh Illinois infantry, and the Fifth Iowa cavalry.--(Doc. 204.) Governor Robinson, of Kansas, in view of the threatening attitude of the Indians on the western, north-western, and southern borders of the State, and the numerous bands of rebel guerrillas liable at any time to invade the State on the east, issued a proclamation calling upon all ablebodied citizens not connected with a volunteer company, to organize immediately in accordance with the militia law, and report to the Adjutant-General of the State without delay. General George W. Morgan sent the following, from his headquarters at Cumberland Gap, to the editors of Kentucky and the neighboring States. Gentlemen: Please to say to the relatives and friends of the soldiers of this command that we have good health and good spirits, and that our condition in every respect is better than that of the enemy who surround us. Let our friends do their duty to our country, and we will try and take care of ourselves.
-five years. Such persons to serve their full term; no one being entitled to a discharge because he might have passed the age of forty-five before such term of service expired. An expedition consisting of the United States gunboats Paul Jones, Cimerone, and three other steam vessels, left Port Royal, S. C., on the thirteenth instant, and proceeded to the Saint John's River, Florida, where they arrived to-day. They immediately attacked the rebel batteries, and, after a few hours' shelling, succeeded in dismounting most of their guns, greatly damaging their breastworks, and completely silencing them. Cumberland Gap, Tenn., was evacuated by the National forces under the command of Gen. George W. Morgan.--(See Supplement.) In consequence of the reported approach of the rebel army under General E. Kirby Smith, considerable excitement existed in Louisville, Kentucky. The troops commenced fortifying the city. Negroes were impressed to throw up riflepits and dig breastworks.
the Territories of Washington and Nevada, suggesting the advantages which would result to the people thereof upon an immediate assertion on their part of their independence of the United States; and proposing, upon their so doing, the formation of a league, offensive and defensive, between said States and Territories and the confederate States of America. A fight took place near Olive Hill, Ky., between the home guards of Carter County and a thousand rebels under the guerrilla Morgan. Morgan commenced the attack, but, after several hours' skirmishing, he was repulsed, losing several of his men. He retreated towards the Licking River, destroying thirty-five houses on his route. This day a Union force under command of General Foster, accompanied by gunboats, left Washington, N. C., and advanced upon Hamilton, taking possession of that place and driving the rebels toward Tarboro. General Scott's letter, reviewing the course he pursued relative to the forts and arsenals at
October 3. The rebel General Bragg issued an order from his headquarters at Lexington, Ky., ordering that the paper currency of the confederate States should be taken at its par value in all transactions whatever, public or private. The order also stated that the refusal to take it, or the exaction of exorbitant prices, would be treated as a military offence, and punished accordingly. The advance brigade of Gen. Geo. W. Morgan's command, from Cumberland Gap, reached Greenupsburgh, Ky., after a march of sixteen days. Many of them were hatless, shoeless, and naked. They had marched twenty miles a day, skirmishing with the rebels as they advanced. Clement C. Clay, Senator from Alabama, submitted the following preamble and resolution in the rebel Congress in session at Richmond, Va.: Whereas, It is notorious that many and most flagrant acts violative of the usages of war, of the rights of humanity and even of common decency, have been, and still are being, perpetrate
t's proclamation of Emancipation, and pointing out the fact that the execution of the Federal laws is confided to the civil authorities, and that armed forces are raised and maintained simply to sustain those authorities. A fight occurred this day at La Vergne, Tenn., between a Union force of two thousand five hundred men, under the command of General Palmer, and a rebel force under Gen. Anderson, resulting in the complete rout of the rebels, and the capture of a large number of prisoners, camp equipage, munitions, and provisons.--(Doc. 215.) The advance of the National forces under General George W. Morgan, reached Frankfort, Ky.--The bark Wave and brig Dunkirk were captured and destroyed by the rebel privateer Alabama, in latitude 40° 23′, longitude 54° 25′. The rebel steamer General Rusk, or Blanche, which had run the blockade with a cargo of cotton, was this day driven ashore near Havana Light, by the United States steamer Montgomery, when she was burned by her
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., New Orleans before the capture. (search)
treet, had got letters of mark and reprisal, and let slip these sharp-nosed deerhounds upon the tardy, unsuspecting ships that came sailing up to the Passes unaware of the declaration of war. But that game too was up. The blockade had closed in like a prison-gate: the lighter tow-boats, draped with tarpaulins, were huddled together under Slaughterhouse Point, with their cold boilers and motionless machinery yielding to rust; the more powerful ones had been moored at the long wharf vacated by Morgan's Texas steamships; there had been a great hammering, and making of chips, and clatter of railroad iron, turning these tow-boats into iron-clad cotton gunboats, and these had crawled away, some up and some down the river, to be seen in that harbor no more. At length only the foundries, the dry-docks across the river, and the ship-yard in suburb Jefferson, where the great ram Mississippi was being too slowly built, were active, and the queen of Southern commerce, the city that had once belie
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
r Savannah prior to the battle of Shiloh, constituted an important part in the plan of campaign, but could not be made absolute with reference to military operations which depended so much on undetermined conditions. For East Tennessee, General George W. Morgan, the officer assigned to the command of a column operating in that direction from Kentucky, was instructed, as a first step, to take Cumberland Gap if practicable, or to hold the enemy in check on that line if his force should prove insuarleston railway in the direction of Chattanooga — a movement to which, on June 11th, Halleck gave the objective of Chattanooga and Cleveland and Dalton ; the ultimate purpose being to take possession of east Tennessee, in cooperation with General G. W. Morgan. To counteract these plans, General Bragg began, on June 27th, the transfer of a large portion of his army to Chattanooga by rail, via Mobile, and about the middle of August set out on the northward movement which terminated only within s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
s army to Tupelo, where, June 27th, he was succeeded in the command by General Braxton Bragg. Halleck occupied Corinth on the day of its evacuation, and May 31st instructed General Buell, commanding the Army of the Ohio, to repair the Memphis and Charleston railway in the direction of Chattanooga — a movement to which, on June 11th, Halleck gave the objective of Chattanooga and Cleveland and Dalton ; the ultimate purpose being to take possession of east Tennessee, in cooperation with General G. W. Morgan. To counteract these plans, General Bragg began, on June 27th, the transfer of a large portion of his army to Chattanooga by rail, via Mobile, and about the middle of August set out on the northward movement which terminated only within sight of the Ohio River. The Confederate forces in Mississippi were left under command of Generals Van Dorn and Price. About the middle of July General Halleck was called to Washington to discharge the duties of General-in-chief. He left the Distri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
showed 108,538 present for duty. A division reporting 8682 for duty, under the Federal General George W. Morgan, was at Cumberland Gap; a division with 6411 for duty, under General Ormsby M. Mitchel, dated July 14th, 1862, estimated Stevenson's division at 10,000, Heth's and McCown's at 10,000, Morgan's cavalry 1300. Official Records, Vol. XVI., Pt. II., p. 727.--editors. Forrest and John H. Mor General C. L. Stevenson, with nearly nine thousand men, was ordered to watch the Federal General G. W. Morgan, who occupied Cumberland Gap. General Smith started on the 14th en route to Rogers's Gap,rate supplies, arouse the people, and raise and organize troops for the Confederacy. General George W. Morgan (Federal), who was left at Cumberland Gap with 8682 men, seeing these active movements 00 Collected at Louisville30,000 Carried to Louisville by Buell, September 25th to 29th54,198 Morgan's Seventh Division8,084   Total under Buell's and Wright's command137,282 But see other est
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
assistance of General Marshall in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. The Federal general, George W. Morgan, had evacuated Cumberland Gap, and followed by Stevenson, who had been instructed to observe and pursue him if he moved, was making his way to the Ohio. It was intended that Marshall and Morgan should intercept and arrest his march until Stevenson could overtake him and attack him in rear. sent to eastern Kentucky, as I have said, to intercept the retreat of the Federal general, George W. Morgan. He did not find Marshall in the vicinity where he was instructed to seek him, nor, indeed from Manchester via Booneville to Mount Sterling, doubtless to reach the Ohio at Maysville, Colonel Morgan expected to strike the enemy between Booneville and Mount Sterling. But General Morgan concGeneral Morgan concentrated at Irvine on the 21 st, and moved toward Proctor. The Confederate cavalry then moved as rapidly as the mountainous country permitted, and receiving further information that the enemy had tur
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