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well. July 28th, 1862. The report of Hindman's having captured Curtis untrue ; but our army is doing well in the West. Murfreesboroa, in Tennessee, has been captured by Confederates-a brigade, two brigadiers, and other officers, taken. Jack Morgan is annoying and capturing the Kentucky Yankees. The true Southerners there must endure an almost unbearable thraldom! A long letter from S. S., describing graphically their troubles when in Federal lines. Now they are breathing freelyope still imminent. Major Bailey made a brilliant cavalry raid a few days since upon the enemy in Nicholas County, in which he took the command of a lieutenant-colonel prisoners, burnt their stores, and brought off many horses, mules, and arms. Morgan continues his successful raids in the West. The enemy has abandoned the siege of Vicksburg for the time. August 9th, 1862. We hear of a little cavalry fight at Orange Court-House, in which we drove off the enemy. General Pope continues to
y way home, amid brilliantly lighted houses and badly lighted streets. Squads of soldiers were sauntering along, impregnating the air with tobacco-smoke; men were standing at every corner, lamenting the fill of Atlanta or the untimely end of General Morgan. I too often caught a word, conveying blame of the President for having removed General Johnston. This blame always irritates me, because the public became so impatient at General Johnston's want of action, that they were clamorous for hisapers report all quiet at Petersburg, except that shells are daily thrown into the city, and that many of the women and children are living in tents in the country, so as to be out of the reach of shells. The death of the bold and dashing General Morgan is deeply regretted. He has done us great service throughout the war, but particularly since his wonderful escape from his incarceration in the Ohio Penitentiary. It seems so short a time since he was here, all classes delighting to do him
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nd Hindman. General Hill has found it impossible to carry out the part assigned to Cleburne's division. The General commanding desires that you will execute, without delay, the order issued to General Hill. You can move to Davis's cross-roads, by the direct road, from your present position at Anderson's, along which General Hindman has passed. I am, General, etc., Geo. W. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General. And both Hindman and Hill were notified. Hindman had halted his division at Morgan's, some three or four miles from Davis's crossroads in the cove, and at this point Buckner joined him during the afternoon of the 10th. Reports fully confirming previous information in regard to the position of the enemy's forces, were received during the 10th, and it became certain that he was moving his three columns to form a junction upon us, at or near Lafayette. The corps near Colonel Winston's, moved on the mountain towards Alpine, a point twenty miles south of us. The one opposite
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
nd Hindman. General Hill has found it impossible to carry out the part assigned to Cleburne's division. The General commanding desires that you will execute, without delay, the order issued to General Hill. You can move to Davis's cross-roads, by the direct road, from your present position at Anderson's, along which General Hindman has passed. I am, General, etc., Geo. W. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General. And both Hindman and Hill were notified. Hindman had halted his division at Morgan's, some three or four miles from Davis's crossroads in the cove, and at this point Buckner joined him during the afternoon of the 10th. Reports fully confirming previous information in regard to the position of the enemy's forces, were received during the 10th, and it became certain that he was moving his three columns to form a junction upon us, at or near Lafayette. The corps near Colonel Winston's, moved on the mountain towards Alpine, a point twenty miles south of us. The one opposite
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
Lee and Scott. Paper read at the Re-union of Morgan's Men at Lexington, Ky., by Col. Thomas W. Bullitt. Fellow Soldiers,—In performing the duty assigned to me by your committee, it may perhaps be expected that I should direct attention to something directly or remotely connected with Morgan's command, but about these mattersMorgan's command, but about these matters I prefer to talk to you in the camp rather than to write about them. I feel the more strongly justified in what I am about to state by a belief that in any meeting of Confederate soldiers incidents not hitherto made public in the life of that great leader of armies, General Lee, will be found of interest; and quite recently I ter from Joshua F. Bullitt. Louisville, Ky., July 23rd, 1883. Thomas W. Bullitt, Louisville, Ky.: I have read what you propose to say at the meeting of Morgan's command, about to take place in Lexington, Ky., concerning the statements of Colonel Thomas L. Alexander, as to the interview between General Scott and the then
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
ground. But we must continue to fight with unabated zeal, and trust in God, and victory will crown our efforts. April 26th.—Orders to cook five days rations, and be ready to march at a moment's notice. We expect a great battle in a few days. Sunday, April 27th.—Spent the morning working on the trenches. In the afternoon walked over to see Jack and Billy Gordon, and rode with them into Corinth. Glorious news is circulating in camp. New Orleans is safe, Huntsville is retaken, and Jack Morgan has whipped the Federals out of Tuscumbia. The clouds are breaking. April 29th.—The regiment was detailed this morning to work on the trenches. We had worked about two hours, when we were ordered to form in line of battle. Cannonading was heard in the direction of Monterey. Halleck is advancing upon this place, and we may expect a great battle to-morrow or next day. Spent the afternoon washing my clothes and playing chess with Harry Cowperthwaite, of the Maynard Rifles. Reports fr<
dispatch from Memphis, which says that the enemy commenced the attack on Fort Pillow on Sunday, 13th inst., and renewed it on Monday, without result. Five gunboats and three mortar boats were engaged in the siege. The Federals have landed a heavy force on Forked Deer river, above the fort. It is believed that the Federals are falling down the Tennessee river. The Memphis Appeal, of the 16th, contains Gen. Price's resignation as Commander of the Missouri State Troops. An arrival from Paducah reports that Gen. Hallack was there on the 10th inst. [Second Dispatch.] Augusta, April 26.--The New Orleans Picayune has a dispatch from Corinth, dated 16th, which says that the report in the Memphis papers of the landing of a Federal force near Fort Pillow is untrue. Gens. Breckinridge and Hindman have been appointed Major-Generals; Col. Thos. Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General to Gen. Beauregard, has been appointed Brigadier General, and Capt. Jack Morgan, Colonel.
under arrest. Gen. Buell is now in command of all the Yankee forces in Tennessee. Col. Jack Morgan surprised 300 Yankee cavalry at Tompkinsville, Monroe county, Ky., a few days ago. He captu30 and wounded 25. He also captured 40 horses and eight wagons, containing guns and ammunition. Morgan had two wounded, none killed. Another account. Knoxville, July 15. --On the 9th instant, at Tompkinsville. Monroe county. Kentucky, Colonel Morgan's squadron surprised and routed the Seventh Pennsylvania regiment, killing thirty-four, wounding forty, and capturing thirty. Among the is two slightly wounded. The whole camp of the enemy and all the stores fell into the hands of Morgan, including one hundred head of horses and mules, a hundred rifles, and a large quantity of ammunundred rifles, and a large quantity of ammunition and clothing. It was not Capt. Llewellyn, Col. Morgan's quartermaster, who was killed as reported, but Captain O'Brien, of the Texas Rangers.
stics; public amusements, fireworks, dancing, &c. Upwards of 5,000 members of the German shooters' guilds are expected, besides odd hundred thousands of people in general from near and afar, Russians and Japanese Included. From Kentucky — Jack Morgan again, [Correspondence of the New York Times.] Louisville, July 12. --You know Jack Morgan has turned up again at Tompkinsville and Glasgow, and issued another manifesto against the "Hessian invader," "foreign hordes. " and "Northern tJack Morgan has turned up again at Tompkinsville and Glasgow, and issued another manifesto against the "Hessian invader," "foreign hordes. " and "Northern tyrants." On the strength of "the late Richmond victory," he appears once more among us, to raise h — ll and turn up Jack." He fancies himself a greater than Ashby or "Stonewall." In fact, he has created quite a scare on the other side of Green river. But his doings so far seem to have been greatly exaggerated. However, it won't do to let him, Ferguson, Hamilton, Hunt, and their brigand gangs run at large any longer. Gen. Boyle is doing his best to abate such nuisances and pests. The Nas
ne hundred and Twenty-five killed and wounded--Morgan's from Sixty to eighty--Destruction of bridge,s came riding in in hot haste, crying out that Morgan was coming in force to attack the town. Col. Main at that distance from the bridge. As Morgan afterwards told Glass, he commanded this divise bridge, Capt. G. opened on them with grape. Morgan replied with a brass howitzer, firing shell. d from the north in check a little while. Morgan, with two men, set fire to the depot, a large began. After the fight Thursday evening, Morgan paroled about two hundred men he had disarmed,counts of Morgan at Lebanon, Ky. It says: Morgan took possession of the town near three o'clockg them as guerrillas, and deserving death. Morgan himself severely misused Mr. Hastings after heof the men had the most implicit confidence in Morgan. He does not appear to care much for discipliy Smith, with a cavalry force much inferior to Morgan's, attacked the latter near Paris, defeated hi[3 more...]
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