Your search returned 94 results in 22 document sections:

1 2 3
ent Wagner's division of the Fourth corps, and Morgan's division of the Fourteenth corps back to Chairst. On the twenty-ninth of September, General Morgan's division of the Fourteenth corps moved bal Hood. On the twenty-fourth of October, General Morgan's division rejoined the corps at GaylesvilSeptember, on which day, at an early hour, General Morgan's division (Second) left by railroad for Centy-eighth, preparatory to our march to Rome, Morgan's and Carlin's divisions, with the trains, croonville. On the twenty-fourth, Carlin's and Morgan's divisions, with their trains, crossed the ri accomplished by the afternoon of the second. Morgan's division, in charge of the whole corps trainerable force. December fourth, Carlin's and Morgan's divisions, with the corps trains, after destezer Church, to Cuyler's plantation, where General Morgan, who was in the advance, found the enemy old-work, disposed to dispute his advance. General Morgan immediately placed a couple of field-piece[9 more...]
w miles to Buffalo Creek. Over this stream we threw a pontoonbridge, and also built one small trestle-bridge during the night. 26th. Took up the pontoon-bridge and marched the same day to Sandersville, a distance of ten miles. 27th. Sent Major Downey with two companies and one hundred and twenty feet of bridge, to report to General Baird, whose division marched on the extreme left flank. The remainder of my command moved on the river road from Louisville, with Generals Carlin's and Morgan's divisions of the Fourteenth corps. 28th. Continued our march to Louisville; reached there the same evening. Found Colonel Moore's bridge thrown over the large Ogeechee, and Major Downey's thrown over the small Ogeechee River, near Louisville. Finished corduroying the swamps on either side of the Ogeechee River. We remained in camp near Louisville until the afternoon of December first. December 1.--Marched at ten o'clock P. M., going a distance of twelve miles, on the road to Mill
and efficiency. The gallantry of Lieutenant Chamberlaine, the Adjutant, was conspicuous. The members of my staff--Major R. C. Morgan, A. A. General; Major J. G. Field, A. Q. M.; Major E. B. Hill, Division Commissary; Major J. M. Daniel, Volunteer A commanding. Report of Brigadier-General field. headquarters First brigade, Light Division, July 20, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: I have the honor to report that, on the twenty-sixth ult., I was directed toadier-General commanding. Report of Brigadier-General Branch. headquarters Fourth brigade, Light division. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: On Tuesday, twenty-fourth of June, I received orders from General Lee to tak Joseph Graham, Captain, commanding Tenth North Carolina Troops. Reports of Captain Masters. July 12, 1862. Captain Morgan, A. A. General, Light Division: Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the
Brigadier-General, commanding First Division, V. A. Report of Brigadier-General field. headquarters First brigade, Light division, August 13, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan, A. A. G.: Major: I have the honor to report that my brigade marched from Orange Court-House early on the morning of the ninth instant, bringing up the ra, commanding Brigade. Report of Brigadier-General Archer. headquarters Archer's brigade, General A. P. Hill's Light division, August 14, 1862. To Major R. C. Morgan, A. A. General, A. P. Hill's Division: Major: I have the honor to report that, early on the morning of the ninth instant, I marched with my brigade, abou H. Vaughan, Courtnay artillery, wounded. Report of Brigadier-General Branch. headquarters Branch's brigade, A. P. Hill's division, August 18, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: I have the honor to report that, on Saturday, ninth August, whilst on the march toward Culpeper Court-House, I was orde
s, McLester, Corporal Crump, privates McGregor, Beasley, Odell, and Morgan. The Second North Carolina, after the death of the gallant and accssion of my orders under a fire frequently uncomfortably hot; Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Wingate, Captain R. H. Adaheadquarters Third brigade, Light division, October 26, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General, Light Division: Major: I havebrigade, camp Gregg, near Fredericksburg, Va., March 1, 1863. Major R. C. Morgan, A. A. General, A. P. Hill's Light Division: Major: I haveal Lane. headquarters Fourth brigade, November 14, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan: I have the honor to submit the following report of the pavision, Second army corps, camp Gregg, Va., February 9, 1863. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: In compliance with theWalker. headquarters artillery battalion, March 1, 1863. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General, Light Division: Major: I have
rt of Colonel Hamilton, commanding brigade. bivouac on Rappahannock River, headquarters Second brigade, A. P. Hill's Light division, December 22, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan, A. A. G.: Major: In obedience to orders from division headquarters, I have the honor to forward the enclosed reports of the regimental commanders of thi, Colonel, commanding Brigade. Report of Brigadier-General Thomas. headquarters Thomas's brigade, General A. P. Hill's division, December 20, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan, A. A. G.: Major: On Friday, December twelve, 1862, according to orders from Major-General Hill, this brigade left its camp near Mr. John Alsop's house, timer, Captain, and Acting Chief of Artillery of Ewell's Division. Report of Colonel R. L. Walker. headquarters artillery corps, December 21, 1862. Major R. C. Morgan, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the artillery corps of the light division in the e
Prisoners of war Holland Thompson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History in the College of the City of New York A Union sentry at Libby in 1865—Confederate prisoners Prisoners of war in fort Delaware, May, 1864: brave and Distin-Guished southneners in a Union prison. Captain Hart Gibson (No. 4) was serving at the time of his capture as assistant adjutant-general on General John H. Morgan's staff. Colonel R. C. Morgan (No. 11) and Captain C. H. Morgan (No. 13) were brothers of General Morgan. The former served on the staff of General A. P. Hill in the Army of Northern Virginia, and subsequently commanded the Fourteenth Kentucky Cavalry. The latter served as aide-de-Camp on his brother's staff. Lieutenant Henry H. Brogden (No. 1), of Maryland, later held an official position under President Cleveland. Lieut.-Colonel Joseph T. Tucker (No. 2) served with the Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry. Brigadier-General R. B. Vance (No. 6) was a brother of the distinguished Zebulon B.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Fort Morgan--reports of General R. L. Page. (search)
ne after the fleet, was sunk by the second shot, and being run ashore was deserted by her crew, and afterwards burnt by a boat from the Confederate States gunboat Morgan. One man was found on her, whose legs had been so shattered that he died while the officer was on board. He was thrown overboard. The spirit displayed by thithe military operations to that date. After the reduction of Gaines, I felt confident that the whole naval and land force of the enemy would be brought against Morgan, and was assiduous in preparing my fort for as good a defence as possible. For the state of the work I beg leave to refer you to Chief Engineer Sheliha's letter pparent to either side. Soon thereafter a flag of truce was reported from the fleet, and communicated to this effect: Brigadier-General R. L. Page, Commanding Fort Morgan: Sir — To prevent the unnecessary sacrifice of human life which must follow the opening of our batteries, we. demand the unconditional surrender of Fort
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Atchafalaya river-letter from General Thomas Green. (search)
ut the loss which was greater to me than all the others put together, was the desperate wounding of the best cavalry officer in the army--Major Boon of my brigade. The Major's right arm was torn to atoms, and amputated in the socket of the shoulder. His left hand was also torn up and two-thirds of it amputated, leaving him only his little finger and one next to it, having lost the thumb and two fingers of that hand and over half the hand itself. I am again encamped at my old headquarters, Morgan's ferry, on Atchafalaya. The Yankees are to-day making demonstrations as though they intended to advance upon us; but if they do, it will be after very heavy reinforcement, as we gave those now here such a terrible basting day before yesterday that they will not again voluntarily engage us. There has been a torrent of rain. It poured down all day the day we were fighting, and rained without intermission twenty-four hours after that day. The mud in these swamps is over the tops of our hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.19 (search)
th and 18th. Captain Browne, Captain Hewlett, Lieutenant Arrington and I changed our quarters to Division 27, and are messing together. Twenty-seven is known as the Kentucky division, as most of its inmates are from that State and belonged to Morgan's cavalry, having been captured during the famous Ohio raid, and for awhile confined in the Ohio State Penitentiary, their heads shaved, and dressed in felon's garb. A majority of them are of fine personal appearance, intelligent, social and wely months, but remains unterrified and resolute in his allegiance to the Confederacy. I enjoy his strong, expressive language much. Browne, Arrington and Fannin play chess nearly all day. I play it very indifferently, and prefer reading. Colonel R. C. Morgan, a younger brother of General John H. Morgan, Captain C. C. Corbett, a Georgian in the Fourteenth Kentucky cavalry, Lieutenant M. H. Barlow (the wit of the room), and Lieutenant I. P. Wellington, both of the Eighth Kentucky cavalry, are am
1 2 3