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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
the home guards, who fired from the houses, causing a loss of twenty per cent of his force, with a much heavier loss to the enemy. Among his killed were Capts. Samuel D. Morgan (a cousin of Col. John H. Morgan), Allen and Kennett, and Lieuts. Greenbury Roberts, George White, Rogers, King and William Courtland Prentice, son of GeMorgan), Allen and Kennett, and Lieuts. Greenbury Roberts, George White, Rogers, King and William Courtland Prentice, son of George D. Prentice, editor of the Louisville Journal. This was the only engagement which occurred on the Ohio during the campaign, although previously Col. R. M. Gano, of Morgan's cavalry, had captured Maysville without a fight. t, and Lieuts. Greenbury Roberts, George White, Rogers, King and William Courtland Prentice, son of George D. Prentice, editor of the Louisville Journal. This was the only engagement which occurred on the Ohio during the campaign, although previously Col. R. M. Gano, of Morgan's cavalry, had captured Maysville without a fight.
of the report of the keeper of public arms, he had ordered and received at the arsenal 1,400 rifle muskets. This constituted the armament of the State of Tennessee. The chief of ordnance, Capt. M. H. Wright, thoroughly educated to the duties of his place, soon organized a force for the repair of arms, the manufacture and preparation of ammunition and the equipments of the soldiers, and for the conversion of the flint-lock muskets to percussion; and aided by patriotic citizens like Samuel D. Morgan, established a plant for the manufacture of percussion caps. Thus he was able to supply the troops of Tennessee as they took the field. Shipments of caps were made to the authorities at Richmond, who used them very largely at the first battle of Manassas. About 3,000 pounds of powder were being manufactured daily. Foundries for the manufacture of field guns were constructed at Nashville and Memphis, and by November, guns of good pattern were turned out at both points at the rate of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Mrs. Henrietta H. Morgan. [from the Louisville, Ky., courier Journal, September 9, 1891.] (search)
of her sons and General Hill and war relics in her possession, of which she had a large number. Mrs. Morgan's husband, Calvin C. Morgan, was a brother of Samuel D. Morgan, of Nashville, one of the first merchants of that city. When driven further South by the Federal occupancy of Nashville, Samuel devoted a great deal of timend money to the aid of Tennessee and Kentucky soldiers in the hospitals. Calvin was a highly cultivated and educated man and well known throughout Kentucky. Mrs. Morgan herself was universally beloved. She was widely known and esteemed, and thoroughly unselfish, with a disposition that endeared her to all with whom she came ineared her to all with whom she came in contact. Her death causes widespread regret. Mrs. Duke has gone to Lexington, and General Duke will follow to-day. The funeral will take place from the family residence in Lexington to-morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock, the interment being in the cemetery where General Morgan's remains rest.
The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], Bonds and stocks of the Confederate States. (search)
Percussion Caps. --The factory at Nashville Tenn., under the superintendence of Colonel Samuel D. Morgan, is turning out daily 125,000 musket caps.