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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 15 1 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
to tea, at her house in Park Street. the author of Frankenstein. I dined with Theobald, William Theobald, author of The Law of Principal and Surety. whose legal writings you well know, and, stealing away from his drawing-rooms, repaired to Lady Morgan's. Lady Sydney Morgan, 1783-1859; daughter of Robert MacOwen, of the English stage; a native of Dublin, wife of Sir Thomas Charles Morgan, and author of poems, novels, and books of travel. Her writings were much read, and yielded a consideLady Sydney Morgan, 1783-1859; daughter of Robert MacOwen, of the English stage; a native of Dublin, wife of Sir Thomas Charles Morgan, and author of poems, novels, and books of travel. Her writings were much read, and yielded a considerable income; but her style encountered much criticism. H. F. Chorley has left an account of her,—Autobiography, Vol. I. p. 230. Sumner met her on his second visit to England, in 1857. Her Ladyship had particularly invited me to her party on this evening, saying, Promise me that you will come on Sunday night, and I will have all the literary characters of London. I will trot them all out for your benefit. Accordingly, there were Sam Rogers, —just returned with renewed youth from Paris,—Kenyo<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
of laughter or ridicule. I know few persons whom I have always seen dressed in better taste or looking more like a gentleman. I have already written you of Lady Morgan. Her Ladyship, you know, is a fierce Democrat. She was in the midst of professions of democracy during a morning call, when the knocker resounded—as these Enger of the Marquis of Douro, He was born in 1807, and succeeded to the dukedom on the death of his father, in 1852. the eldest son of the Duke of Wellington. Lady Morgan at once straightened herself in her seat, assumed a queenly air, and, when the noble lord entered, received him with no little dignity. I was presented to his . He is about forty, and appears to be a pleasant, good-natured, and rather clever person, looking very much like the great Duke. A far different person from Lady Morgan is Mrs. Shelley. I passed an evening with her recently. She is sensible, agreeable, and clever. There were Italians and French at her house, and she entertai
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
of laughter or ridicule. I know few persons whom I have always seen dressed in better taste or looking more like a gentleman. I have already written you of Lady Morgan. Her Ladyship, you know, is a fierce Democrat. She was in the midst of professions of democracy during a morning call, when the knocker resounded—as these Enger of the Marquis of Douro, He was born in 1807, and succeeded to the dukedom on the death of his father, in 1852. the eldest son of the Duke of Wellington. Lady Morgan at once straightened herself in her seat, assumed a queenly air, and, when the noble lord entered, received him with no little dignity. I was presented to his . He is about forty, and appears to be a pleasant, good-natured, and rather clever person, looking very much like the great Duke. A far different person from Lady Morgan is Mrs. Shelley. I passed an evening with her recently. She is sensible, agreeable, and clever. There were Italians and French at her house, and she entertai