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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Tom Morgan or search for Tom Morgan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Mrs. Henrietta H. Morgan. [from the Louisville, Ky., courier Journal, September 9, 1891.] (search)
omas H. and Frank H. Morgan. All of them, and her two sons-in-law, entered the Confederate army, and of the number her most famous son, General John H. Morgan, Tom Morgan and General Hill were killed in battle, or rather the great cavalry leader was shot down at Greenville, Tenn., after surrender. All the others were wounded at ank, the youngest, was but fifteen when he enlisted. Calvin, Dick and Charlton were all officers, and there was not one among them who did not do his duty. Mrs. Morgan was devoted to the Confederate cause, and the death of her sons and son-in-law had a deep effect upon her and affected her health. During the latter part of hee her chief pleasure was found in contemplating the portraits of her sons and General Hill and war relics in her possession, of which she had a large number. Mrs. Morgan's husband, Calvin C. Morgan, was a brother of Samuel D. Morgan, of Nashville, one of the first merchants of that city. When driven further South by the Federal