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The Daily Dispatch: August 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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mmands. By this surrender we obtained a sufficient quantity of guns to arm all our men who were without them; also a quantity of ammunition, of which we stood sorely in need. At the order to charge, Duke's regiment rushed forward, and poor Tommy Morgan, who was always in the lead, ran forward and cheered the men with all the enthusiasm of his bright nature. Almost at the first volley he fell back, pierced though the heart. His only words were: Brother Cally, they have killed me. Noble youth! how deeply lamented by all who knew you! This was a crushing blow to General Morgan, as his affection for his brother exceeded the love of Jonathan to David. It caused a terrible excitement, and the men were in a state of frenzy. It required the utmost energy and promptitude on the part of the officers to prevent a scene of slaughter, which all would deeply have lamented. Our men behaved badly here, breaking open stores and plundering indiscriminately. All that officers, could do was d
fronted our whole line of battle, capturing a battery and taking off three guns. It was late in the afternoon when Hood's division was being sorely pressed, that Trigg's brigade of Preston's division, was detached, rendering timely aid, and driving the enemy from the desired position. At dark, Hood's command fell back three hundred yards across the Chattanooga road, and formed line of battle on a ridge. It should have been stated that in the morning of this day Colonel Johnson, commanding Morgan's cavalry, as well as Pegram's cavalry, took a gallant part in the fight on our right, and that Scott's Louisiana cavalry with three companies held at bay seven regiments of infantry. The battle of Saturday had closed without our having gained any decided advantage, and from the stubborn resistance made by the enemy, our lines were but little advanced. All night long the enemy's axes were heard cutting timber to make breastworks, and they actually piled up their own dead for this purpose
ity of ammunition, of which we stood sorely in used. At the order to charge, Duke's regiment rushed forward, and poor Tommy Morgan, who was always in the lead ran forward and cheered the men with all the enthusiasm of his bright nature. Almost at tother Cally, they have killed me." Noble youth! how deeply lamented by all who know you. This was a crushing blow to General Morgan, as his affection for his brother exceeded the love of Jonathan to David. It caused a terrible excitement, and the magainst "the invading rebs." Twenty minutes spent in drilling inspired complete confidence; and when the advance guard of Morgan's command had passed without Capt P. permitting the Hoosiers to fire, he ordered them into the road and surrendered them bered about four hundred and seventy five men. From the crossing of the Ohio to our entrance in Greenbrier our men lived on beef alone, without salt, and no tread. Yet their only wish seemed to be for the safety of General Morgan and the command.