Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Daniel Morgan or search for Daniel Morgan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
s compelled to fall back and retreated to this place, Winnsboro, from which he might watch the threatened points of Camden, Granby and Ninety-Six. His headquarters were in this town until Greene, with Gates' army reorganized, advanced into South Carolina for its recovery. But while Cornwallis was here, an opportunity was allowed Sumter to repay Tarleton at Blackstocks for his surprise at Fishing Creek, and to avenge the slaughter there. Then followed our great victory at Cowpens under Morgan, which transferred the seat of war from this part of our State, and left it rest until peace and independence were secured. I have said that the people who settled this part of the country carried with them the axe, the rifle, and the Bible, and that the meeting-house and the school-house were put up together. We have seen that they knew well how to use the rifle, and it is not inappropriate here to observe in passing that not even in all these disturbances of revolution and war was the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Major R. C. M. Page, Chief of Confederate States artillery, Department of Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee, from October, 1864, to May, 1865. (search)
y: Lieutenant G. O. Talbot in command, four acting gun-corporals and five privates, besides twenty-three men detailed from Duke's cavalry brigade, by order of General Morgan during his raid. Rest of Byrne's officers and men reported captured in Morgan's raid and now in United States prison at Camp Douglas. No note made of horsesMorgan's raid and now in United States prison at Camp Douglas. No note made of horses and wagons; probably unserviceable, if any. October 10th, 1864.—My servant and horse not having yet arrived from Petersburg, Va., walked to Saltville. Found there King's, and remnants of Levi's and Sawyer's batteries. King's: three iron 12-pound howitzers, two brass howitzers, one iron 6 pounder, unserviceable from enlarged Greene county, Tennessee. Remained there that night. November 25th, 1864.—Reached Greenville and stayed at the house of Mrs. Williams. Was informed that General Morgan was sleeping at this house when he was surprised and killed in the back yard. Dangerous to be alone in this part of the country, as it swarms with bushwhacke
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roll of the Rockbridge Battery of artillery, April 10, 1865. (search)
sent. McCorkle, T. E. Present. McCorkle, T. M. Absent. McCorkle, W. Present. McCrum, Barton. Present. McGruder, D. N. Present. McGruder, Horatio. Present. Marshall, John. Present. Martin,——. Captured at Gettysburg. Absent. Matter, Samuel. Present. Meade, Frank A. Present. Minor, Launcelot. Wounded at Cumberland Church. Absent. Montgomery, B. Present. Moore, Ed. Present. Moore, John H. Present. Moore, L. Absent. Mooterspaw, W. Present. Morgan,——. At home sick. Absent. Myers, John. Present. Page, Powell. Present. Paine, James. At home sick. Absent. Paine, M. Absent. Paxton,——. Wounded. Absent. Phillips,——. Wounded. Absent. Pollard,——. Present. Pugh, George. Present. Pugh, John. Present. Private Rader,——. On Furlough. Absent. Rawlings, J. M. On furlough. Absent. Reintzel. Wounded. Absent. Robertson, John. Present. Root, Erastus. Present. Ruffin, J. R. Present
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
of the Army of the Cumberland charged with this subject, called his committee here last night. It organized and invited co-operation from the ex Confederates present. The meeting here noticed was the result. There were present Generals Rosecrans, Baird, Reynolds, Cist, Manderson and Boykin, and Colonel Kellogg, of the Union officers, and Generals Bate of Tennessee, Colquitt of Georgia, Walthall of Mississippi, Wheeler of Alabama, Wright of Tennessee, and Colonels Bankhead of Alabama, and Morgan of Mississippi. The plan of preserving and marking the field of Chickamauga under the auspices of the joint memorial corporation representing all the States that had troops there, patterned in general after the Gettysburg Association, was cordially approved. Generals Cist and Colquitt were appointed a committee, with power to add four to their number, to prepare an act of incorporation and correspond with the leading officers from each State whose troops fought at Chickamauga, with the v
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
arolina general was slain, whose troops suffered greatly. It was General George Rogers Clarke, of Virginia, who, with a Virginia brigade, chastised the Indians that committed the massacre in the valley of Wyoming. He made a Stonewall Jackson march to the rear, penetrated to the Upper Mississippi, captured the governor of Detroit, and took large booty in his raid. At Monmouth and Saratoga Southern blood was commingled with the Northern in the battles of freedom. In the battle of Saratoga, Morgan's Virginia Riflemen greatly distinguished themselves and slew General Fraser, the inspiring spirit of the British army. The guerilla troops, under Sumter, Marion, Moultrie, Pickens, Clarke, etc., drove the British step by step back to Charleston, where they were cooped up till the end came. It is my deliberate opinion that no battles of the Revolution will compare in brilliancy with the defence of Moultrie, the defeat of Ferguson at King's Mountain, and the defeat of Tarleton at Cowpens, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Jr., Lt. Henry, 116, 132, 161. Montgomery, Sergeant S., 191. Moodie, J. P., 104. Moody, Capt. J. M., 20 Moore, John, 9 Moore, Capt. W. S., 107. Moore, Col. John C, 299. Moreau, Gen., 341. Moorman, Capt., 88. Morgan, Col., 349. Morgan, Gen., Daniel, 12. Morgan, Gen. John H., 59; death of, 63. Morris Creek Bridge. N. C., 433. Morris, Gen., 87. Morris Island, 15, 26, 104, 151, 154; evacuated, 170. Mosby, Col. John S., 264. Morton, Capt. T. C., 47, 50. Moultrie, Fort, 12, 1Morgan, Gen. John H., 59; death of, 63. Morris Creek Bridge. N. C., 433. Morris, Gen., 87. Morris Island, 15, 26, 104, 151, 154; evacuated, 170. Mosby, Col. John S., 264. Morton, Capt. T. C., 47, 50. Moultrie, Fort, 12, 156. Mount Pleasant, 131. Mount Zion Schools, 12, 13. Mouton, Col., 302. Muller. Musician, 178. Mulvaney, Capt., 404. Munford, Gen. T. T., 296, 354. Munson's Hill, 95. Murfreesboroa, Battle of, 351, 368. Myer, Gen. A. J., 94, 103. Myer, F. L., 395. Myers, Col. A. C., 273. Nance, Capt., 388. Nance, Col. J. D., report of, 379, 390. Napoleon I, Army of, 69,341. Nashville, Fall of, 128 Naval Engagements, 135. Naval Heroes from the North and South, 435, 439 Navarre, Hen