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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 15 3 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Edward Morgan or search for Edward Morgan in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Capture of the steamers Covington and Signal. (search)
countermanded; it being deemed a useless waste of life for more to attempt it, and wholly impossible to remove the wounded, under the fire of the batteries and several hundred sharp-shooters, and the white flag was raised. My station was unfavorable for observation, and my professional duties occupied considerable of my time; but I take pleasure in bearing testimony to the good conduct of those stationed near me, and with whom I came in contact during the action. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant E. Morgan, commanding, appeared to be coolly attending to his duties. Acting Ensign C. P. Bragg, Executive Officer, Ensign W. F. Loan, and Acting Master's Mate R. P. Croft, had charge of the divisions, and, cheering the men by voice and example, held them to their stations, despite the withering fire of the enemy's sharpshooters through the open ports, and were ably seconded by the captains of the guns. To the coolness of the engineers in shutting off the steam and emptying the boilers, when
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
rible manner. Their steampipes were soon cut, and their boilers perforated with shot, notwithstanding which they fought the batteries for five long hours, the vessels being cut all to pieces, and many killed and wounded on board. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant George P. Lord, commanding the Covington, having expended all his shot, spiked his guns, set fire to his vessel, and escaped with what was left of his crew to the shore, and his vessel blew up. The Signal, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Edward Morgan, still fought her guns for half an hour after the destruction of the Covington. He found it impossible to destroy his vessel by burning, her decks being covered with wounded, and hamanity forbade him sacrificing the lives of the noble fellows who had defended their vessel so gallantly. Hegave permission to all those who wished to escape to do so. Some of them attempted to get off by climbing up the bank. Many were killed while doing so, by the murderous fire of musketry poured in