Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George Morgan or search for George Morgan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Personal reminiscences of the last days of Lee and his Paladins. (search)
olored church in this place for many years. On the hills beyond Farmville, there seemed to be a great deal of artillery halted, or parked, as I afterwards learned, and it was here (we know now, that which few knew then), that General Lee opened his first correspondence with Grant in reference to the surrender of the army; and it was a short distance further on that they seemed to be lightening the load of head-quarter's wagons by destroying letters and papers from them. A young man named Morgan, from this city, who had belonged to the 12th Virginia, but who had been detailed as clerk in the medical department of General Lee's headquarters, seemed entrusted with this duty. Here, for the last time, I saw Dr. Guild, General Lee's medical director, and Mrs. Guild, who was trying to make her escape with the army into friendly lines, and General Lee's carriage and horses, which I never saw him use, though I was told that he did ride in the carriage once or twice during the retreat. It
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
Robert F. Henry, E. Winston. Harvey, Mike. Helms,—— Hundley, Charley, wounded in the head at Cedarville. Johnson, John S., from Greenbrier county, W. Va. Kent, Clarence Polk, from Wytheville, Va. Wounded in 1865. Kent, Edwin Dallas, from Wytheville, Va. Wounded in 1865. Lewis, Dr. Granville R. Lewis, William B. Lawson, George W. Lacy, Dr. Horace P. Morton, Clement R., Third Lieutenant. Morton, Henry O., Corporal. Moore, Thomas J., First Sergeant. Morgan, L. Dennis, First Sergeant. Marshall, Hunter H., Jr., killed at Amelia Courthouse, 1865. Marshall, John. Morris, Macon C., wounded at Appomattox Courthouse, April, 1865. Marshall, John P., died from effects of cannon shot. Marshall, Joel W., Lieutenant and Adjutant of 14th Virginia Cavalry. Marshall, Ben W. Marshall, Joel F. Morton, David H. McGhee, William. McCargo, Samuel, killed at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Moseley, J. B. Morton, John J. Welton, F.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Very complete roll [from the Richmond, A., Dispatch, September 16th, 1900.] (search)
Clinedinst, James A.—Captured near Woodstock, October, 1863. Prisoner at Camp Chase and Fort Delaware twenty-two months. Resides at Moorefield, W. Va. Clinedinst, John W.—Captured near Woodstock, Va., October, 1863. Prisoner at Camp Chase and Fort Delaware twenty-two months. Died since the war. Clinedinst, John W.—Discharged at Booneville, Md., September 10, 1862. Re-instated First Lieutenant Company B, 2d Regiment, Local Defence Troop, Richmond. Resides at New Market, Va. Copp, Morgan—Died near Woodstock, February, 1862. Copp, Joseph M.—Died near Woodstock, February, 1862. Copp, Barnett—Surrendered at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864. Prisoner at Fort Delaware, thirteen months. Lives near Saumsville, Va. Conrad, Peter M.—Surrendered near Woodstock, Va., October, 1863. In prison at Camp Chase and Fort Delaware twenty-two months. Resides at Owen's Mills, Md. Crisp, Harry—Died at Chicago subsequent to the war. Was a brother of Lieutenant Charles F. Crisp, C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate States Navy and a brief history of what became of it. [from the Richmond, Va. Times December 30, 1900.] (search)
battle of New Orleans, 1862. Manassas—Schooner, formerly United States revenue-cutter; seized at New Berne, 1861, and name changed to Manassas. She was dismantled after a few months' service. Maurepas—Side-wheel river steamer, bought at New Orleans, 1861, and mounted five guns; sunk by Confederates to obstruct White river in 1862. Missouri—Center wheel iron-clad, eight guns; built at Shreveport, La., in 1864. Mobile—Wooden tug, two guns; burned by Confederates in Yazoo river. Morgan—Merchant steamer, bought at Mobile, 1861; mounted six guns. She was destroyed by Confederates at the fall of that city in 1865. morning light—Steamer, twelve guns, captured from the Federals off Sabine Pass, January 21, 1863. Muscogee—Centre-wheel iron-clad, eight guns; built at Columbus, Ga., and burned at the close of the war. Nansemond—Wooden gun-boat, two guns; built at Norfolk, 1862, and burned by the Confederates at Richmond, 1865. Nashville—Side-wheel merchant
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
James Deal. Jackson Gragg. John C. Lewis. Joseph Phillips, and J. P. Shook., W. L. Thompson. Robert H. Carswell. Cleveland Coffey, a twin. Thomas Crump. William Fleming. Abram Hudson. J. B. Littlejohn. W. E. Phillips, twins. John A. Taylor. M. L. Townsell, a twin.—19. Mortally wounded—privates. J. M. Clouts. Thomas M. Coffey. Rufus Ervine. G. W. Holloway. Joseph Setser. Hosea Stallings. J. G. Coffey, a twin. W. S. Coffey. H. H. Hays. George Morgan. W. E. Setser. William Underdown. Wounded—wounds described. Captain R. M. Tuttle, badly, right leg. Lieutenant C. M. Sudderth, badly in hand. Sergeant J. T. C. Hood, badly in thigh and foot. Sergeant R. N. Hudspeth, by bursting of shell. Sergeant H. C. Coffey, badly in wrist. Corporal S. P. Philyaw, badly in thigh. Corporal A. H. Courtney, leg broken (amputated). Privates. Hezekia Annas, badly in thigh. George Arney, leg broken. S. P. Badger, bad<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
back to Virginia, but no general engagement by the army. Although our troops were still sanguine of the ultimate success of our arms, it was a dark hour for the Confederacy, for about that time came news of Grant's capture of Vicksburg, and of Morgan's defeat in Ohio, besides the successes attending the naval forces of the enemy. In looking over the results of this great struggle, I am struck with the fact that Lee's army, although it received its first check here, after beating its opponed to yield, The cannon of his country pealed Stuart's funeral knell, His soldiers' cheers rang in his ears as Stonewall Jackson fell, Onward o'er gallant Ashby's grave swept war's successful tide, And Southern hopes were living yet when Polk and Morgan died. But he, the leader, on whose words those captains loved to wait, The noblest, bravest, best of all, hath found a harder fate: Unscathed by shot and steel he passed o'er many a desperate field; Oh, God! that he hath lived so long, and only