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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John A. Morgan or search for John A. Morgan in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.27 (search)
men, these officers wished to retain their rank and titles. Besides, when bidding adieu to their friends at home, they had pledged themselves to see to the comfort and interests of their sons. Some talked of going to Virginia, others of joining Morgan, while a few declared they would return to Kentucky, rather than be consolidated with other companies. Colonel Trabue was entirely too shrewd a man to allow these objections to disturb him. Once get enough men into camp, and he would very soon oed yards after crushing the two lines of troops in front of it, its name would still have been immortal. It was about 9 o'clock, when by slow manoeuvering (for we were in the reserve corps), we passed through a field in a small valley in which Morgan's squadron was drawn up in line. Capt. John Churchill and his men sang Cheer, boys, cheer, and our boys responded by affectionate salutation or pleasant repartee. Then and there we begot for ourselves a love that lasts as long as our lives. We
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky in 1862. (search)
ousand soldiers into one of the most hazardous and up to a certain point, most brilliant campaigns of modern warfare. If Morgan had been captured, and if Louisville had been occupied, ensuring the overthrow of Buell, as some military critics are sayghout the department. It was necessary to pursue one of three courses. To assault Cumberland Gap, where the Federal General Morgan was powerfully fortified with ten thousand men; to remain where we were, and by cutting off supplies compel Morgan toMorgan to come out and give battle in the open field; or to advance boldly into the heart of Kentucky. Even a simultaneous assault in front and rear upon Cumberland Gap, never a very promising operation where easy communication between the assailing forces i, could only succeed, if it succeeded at all, at very great sacrifice of life. To remain where we were, hoping to compel Morgan to evacuate his position from want of food, offered equally doubtful results. He was believed to be provisioned for a mo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Winchester in 1863. (search)
inia was all expended but one round held in reserve, and that the other two regiments of my brigade had only a few rounds left; also that the ordnance wagons were behind, and after sending repeatedly, I found it impossible to get more ammunition. Several attempts were made by the enemy to carry the bridge, and almost all the cannoneers of the piece placed there were killed or wounded. The gallant Lieutenant Contee was also wounded, and I must here mention the gallant conduct of Lieutenant John A. Morgan, First North Carolina regiment, who, with Private Owens, of the Maryland artillery, and some occasional assistance, manned the piece most effectively, driving the enemy back from the bridge at a most critical moment, as the regiments near, from want of ammunition, were unable to render any assistance. Up to this time my brigade (with assistance from the artillery) had alone sustained the attack upon the front and right. Brigadier General Walker now came up on my right with two re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
ptember, he received information that the Federal General, Morgan, had evacuated Cumberland Gap on the 17th instant, and wasnchester and West Liberty to the Little Sandy. Brigadier-General Morgan was at once dispatched to Irvine, with a regimenteneral Smith proceeded the next day. There he learned that Morgan had made his escape, having passed West Liberty. From theow the country well, General Smith was led to believe that Morgan would find the route he attempted impracticable, even for the unaccountable delay in the transmission of the fact of Morgan's evacuation. General Stevenson should have followed morent back to Georgetown, Marshall to Owingsville, to prevent Morgan from taking that route to Cincinnati, and General Smith reington. In the meantime Colonel Duke, with a portion of Morgan's cavalry, had attacked the enemy in the town of Augusta, nt of audacity, which they had never shown in any attack. Morgan's escape was considered unfortunate, but Buell's was unive