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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
a battalion of marines, numbering 850. All were saved by the frigate Sabine (see page 866, volume I.), Captain Ringold, excepting a corporal and six men, who were drowned, or crushed between the vessels; nearly all the arms and half of the accouterments of the marines were saved, and about 10,000 rounds of cartridges. The Peerless was a small Lake Ontario steamer, loaded with beef cattle. Its officers and crew were saved by the gunboat Mohican, Captain Gordon. The propeller Osceola, Captain Morrell, also loaded with beef cattle, was wrecked on North Island, near Georgetown, S. C., and its people, 20 in number, were made prisoners. The Union, Captain Sawin, was a new and stanch steamer, and went ashore off Beaufort, N. C., with a large quantity of stores, which were lost. Its crew and passengers, and a few soldiers, in all 738 persons, were captured and taken into the interior. The stanch steamer Winfield Scott, with 500 men of the Fiftieth Pennsylvania regiment, barely escaped
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
Burnside's. corps was posted. Upon a ridge of the first line of hills east of Antietam, between the turnpike and Pry's house, and in front of Sumner and Hooker, batteries of 24-pounder Parrott guns, commanded by Captains Taft, Langner, and Von Kleizer, and Lieutenant Weaver, were planted. On the crest of the hill, above bridge No. 3, were batteries under Captain Weed and Lieutenant Benjamin. Franklin's corps and Couch's division were farther down in Pleasant Valley, near Brownsville, and Morrell's division of Porter's corps was approaching from Boonsborough, and Humphrey's from Frederick. A detachment of the Signal Corps, under Major Myer, had a station on Red Ridge, a spur of South Mountain, which overlooked the Signal-Station on Red Hills. entire field of operations, and from that point it performed very important service. Such was the general position of the contending armies on the 16th of September. The Confederates opened an artillery fire on the Nationals at dawn, bu
ore, Col., 8th Tenn., killed at Stone River, 281. Moore, Col. O. H., worsted by Morgan, 405. Morgan, Gen. John H., 212; 271; his raid, 282; is defeated at Vaught's Hill, 284; raid into Indiana and Ohio, 40)5; his capture and escape, 407; is killed in East Tennessee, 408. Morgan, Gen. Geo. W., abandons Cumberland Gap, 214; at siege of Vicksburg, 289; at capture of Fort Hindman, 293. Morgan, Major, charges at Pleasant Hill, 543. Morganzia, La., surprised by the Rebels, 340. Morrell, Gen., engaged at Gaines's Mill, 155. Morris Island, Gen. Strong established at, 475; failure to blow up the New Ironsides at, 482. Morris, Gen. L. O., killed at Cold Harbor, 582. Morris, Gen. W. H., at the Wilderness, 571. Morton's Engineers, at Stone River, 275. Moseby, Col. John S., his movements, 727. Mosquito Inlet, naval expedition to, 459. Mound City, gunboat, boiler exploded, 57. Mower, Gen., at Corinth, 226; at Vicksburg, 311; at Pleasant Hill, 548; in Misso
Martin's battery, slightly, lost his speech. Freeman Carey,Co. C, Martin's battery, slightly. Tim Donohue, Co. C, Martin's battery, thumb amputated. Cyrus Wilcox, Co. C, Berdan's sharpshooters, slightly. C. W. Peck, corporal, Co. F, Berdan's sharpshooters, slightly. James Way, sergeant, Co. C, Berdan's sharpshooters, slightly. Wm. Parker, Co. B, Berdan's sharpshooters, slightly. William Bombaugh, private, Co. D, Sixty-second Pennsylvania, severely. Corp. Tucker's case is very remarkable. The shot, in passing, did not strike him, but the velocity of the missile raised the skin on his breast, and bereft the poor man of his speech. Prompt attentions were given to the wounded. The hospitals were in charge of Dr. Wyman, Division-Surgeon, and Dr. Waters, General Morrell's Brigade-Surgeon. A large dwelling, about three quarters of a mile from where our guns were planted, the former residence of Dr. Clark, of Delaware, is used as a temporary division hospital.
requested permission to halt at Bristow and rest his men. Sykes's division, of Porter's corps, had spent the whole day of the twenty-seventh, from ten o'clock in the morning until daylight of the twenty-eighth, in camp at Warrenton Junction. Morrell's division of the same corps had arrived at Warrenton Junction during the day of the twenty-seventh, and also remained there during the whole of that night. Porter's corps was by far the freshest in the whole army, and should have been, and, I the enemy with a loss of about three hundred killed and wounded. The enemy has been driven back, but is retiring along the railroad. We must drive him from Manassas and clear the country between that place and Gainesville, where McDowell is. If Morrell has not joined you, send him word to push forward immediately; also, send word to Banks to hurry forward with all speed to take your place at Warrenton Junction. It is necessary on all accounts that you should be here by daylight. I send an of
requested permission to halt at Bristow and rest his men. Sykes's division, of Porter's corps, had spent the whole day of the twenty-seventh, from ten o'clock in the morning until daylight of the twenty-eighth, in camp at Warrenton Junction. Morrell's division of the same corps had arrived at Warrenton Junction during the day of the twenty-seventh, and also remained there during the whole of that night. Porter's corps was by far the freshest in the whole army, and should have been, and, I the enemy with a loss of about three hundred killed and wounded. The enemy has been driven back, but is retiring along the railroad. We must drive him from Manassas and clear the country between that place and Gainesville, where McDowell is. If Morrell has not joined you, send him word to push forward immediately; also, send word to Banks to hurry forward with all speed to take your place at Warrenton Junction. It is necessary on all accounts that you should be here by daylight. I send an of
e ordered to accompany the pursuing column toward Ringgold, and Colonel Buell reports the completion of a bridge across the West-Chickamauga Creek by daylight of Friday morning. Lieutenant Downing, of the Engineer corps, had been ordered to reconstruct the bridge near Shallow Ford, across the South-Chickamauga. On Friday, at Ringgold, orders were given to Lieutenant Wharton to attend to the destruction of the railroad at that place, and whatever mills were in that vicinity. On Sunday, Captain Morrell was ordered to accompany the column under General Gordon Granger toward Knoxville. I beg to call the particular attention of General Grant to the accompanying report of Brigadier-General Wilson, with reference to the bridge constructed under his direction, across the Little Tennessee, for the passage of General Sherman's column over that stream; also that of Captain Poe, Chief Engineer army of the Ohio. The officers of the Engineer corps were zealous and efficient. I forward with the
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
His office was in a house just beyond the camp. Major Stevens walked into the room and seized the fellow by the throat as he was on the point of sending another message. In a few seconds his instrument was knocked to pieces and the wire cut. The valor of our cavalry not only on this but other occasions, cannot be too highly extolled. The Independent Massachusetts cavalry battalion, with Major Stevens at its head, and for its company officers such men as Captains Richmond, Webster, and Morrell, and Lieutenant Holt, has achieved for itself during the past week a high reputation. In this connection I must not omit to mention the eagerness with which Captain Ray, formerly a Lieutenant in company C, accepted the opportunity to accompany Major Stevens as volunteer aid. He recently received his commission as captain in the Fourth Massachusetts cavalry, and when the expedition left Hilton Head, was on the point of going North to join his regiment. All the distance from Jacksonville, e
immediately in my front, I retired on a line with the other regiments, who were formed in my rear, and near to Captain Kemper's battery. It being near dark, I remained here until ordered to join the brigade. Corporal Ward, of company E, was killed; Corporal J. H. Roberts, of company L, was mortally wounded, since dead; private McRae, of company L, shot through hip; private Threatt, of company A, shot through hip; J. Collins, of company C, in hip; E. Lane, company L, slightly in arm; private Morrell, company A, in foot; private Heidricks, company A, slightly; Corporal Bozeman, company F, slightly. We joined the brigade at ten o'clock P. M., and rested for the night near the Williamsburg road. At ten o'clock, on the following morning, (the thirtieth,) we marched back in the direction of Richmond, for several miles, when we moved to the left in the direction of James River, to the Darbytown road. On reaching it, we changed direction again to the left, and in the direction of t
n Garish, of the battery. During the night of the twentieth, under orders from General Hood, I resumed the position to the rear of Groveton, which I had occupied in the morning. At daylight on the thirtieth, the enemy advanced a heavy line of skirmishers toward this point. These were met by my riflemen and those from the Texas brigade, and sharp skirmishing continued until about three o'clock in the afternoon, when the main attack of the enemy began. This attack, which was made by General Morrell's Federal division on General Jackson's right, in full view of my position, was no sooner repulsed than the whole line was ordered forward, and my brigade advanced to Groveton, in support of a battery which was placed at that point. Here it remained for half an hour or more, under a terrific fire of artillery, when I received orders from General Hood to move across the turnpike to the left of the Texas brigade. On reaching an eminence a few hundred yards to the right of the road, whic
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