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L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 9 3 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 4 0 Browse Search
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Contents. Illustrations. 1.--Miss Clara H. Barton.....................................................................Frontispiece. 2.-Barbara Frietchie .....................................................................Vignette title. 3.-Mrs. Mary A. Bickerdyke ................................................................................. 172 4.-Miss Margaret E. Breckenridge.................................................................... 187 5.-Mrs. Nellie Maria Taylor .................................................... 234 6.-Mrs. Cordelia A. P. Harvey .............................................................................. 260 7.-M Iss Emily E. Parsons.................................................. ..................................... 273 8.-Mrs. Mary Morris husband .................................................................... ... 287 9.-Miss Mary J. Safford........ ............................ .................... .............................. 357
es who subsequently arrived, and the desultory and fitful labor performed. Passing from one hospital to another, and bestowing general sympathy, with small works, is not what wounded men want. It was very soon perceptible how the men in that hospital appreciated the solid worth of the one and the tinsel of the other. This imperfect recognition is but a slight testimonial to the lady-like deportment and the untiring labors in behalf of sick and wounded soldiers of Miss Hancock. Mrs. Mary Morris husband. Her ancestry patriotic instincts of the family service in Philadelphia hospitals Harrison's Landing nursing a sick son Ministers to others there Dr. Markland's testimony at Camden Street Hospital, Baltimore Antietam Smoketown Hospital associated with Miss H. M. C. Hall her admirable services as nurse there her personal appearance the wonderful apron with its pockets the battle-flag her heroism in contagious disease attachment of the soldiers for her he
of a different opinion, and was, beside, not altogether pleased with the management of the association. She therefore, after a time, relinquished her official connection with it, though never for one instant relaxing her efforts for the same general object. For a long series of months Mrs. Davis repaired almost daily to the large General Hospital at David's Island, where thousands of sick and wounded men were sometimes congregated. Here she and her chief associates, Mrs. Chapman, and Miss Morris, established the most amicable relations with the surgeon in charge, Dr. McDougall, and were welcomed by him, as valued coadjutors. On the opening of the Soldiers' Rest, in Howard Street, an association of ladies was formed to aid in administering to the comfort of the poor fellows who tarried there during their transit through the city, or were received in the well-conducted hospital connected with the institution. Of this association Mrs. Davis was the Secretary, during the whole te
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Index of names of women whose services are recorded in this book. (search)
89. Howe, Mrs. T. O., 164. Howell, Mrs., 89. Howland, Mrs. Eliza W., 301, 324-326. Howland, Mrs. Robert S., 62, 326, 327. Humphrey, Miss, 164. Husband, Mrs. Mary Morris, 157, 287- 298, 301,316,401. Ide, Mrs., 411. Ives, Mrs. John, 409. Johnson, Miss Addie E., 399. Johnson, Miss Ida, 408. Johnson, Mrs., 209, 210. Johdenhall, Mrs. Elizabeth S., 53. Menefee, Mrs., 410. Merritt, Mrs., 302. Mills, Mrs., 89. Molineaux, Miss, 409. Moore, Mrs., (of Knoxville, Tenn.), 76, 77. Morris, Mrs. E. J., 408. Morris, Miss, 354. Nelson, Mrs. H. A., 409. Nichols, Mrs. Elizabeth A., 408. Nutt, Mrs. J., 409. Ogden, Mrs. Dorothea, 408. Ostram, Miss NMorris, Miss, 354. Nelson, Mrs. H. A., 409. Nichols, Mrs. Elizabeth A., 408. Nutt, Mrs. J., 409. Ogden, Mrs. Dorothea, 408. Ostram, Miss N. L., 408. Otis, Miss Louisa, 408. Otis, Mrs. Mary, 408. Page, Mrs. E. J., 409. Palmer, Mrs. Mary E., 55, 62. Parrish, Mrs. Lydia G., 362-373. Parsons, Miss Emily E., 48, 273-278, 382, 406. Partridge, Mrs. George, 409. Patrick, Miss Jane, 409. Peabody, Miss Harriet, 408. Peabody, Mrs., 408. Penfield, Miss, 410. Pette
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Contents. (search)
Samuel Johnson, 96. Pierce Butler's Ben, 98. Daniel Benson, 104. The Quick-Witted Slave, 108. James Davis, 112. Mary Holliday, 116. Thomas Harrison, 122. James Lawler, 123. William Anderson, 126. Sarah Roach, 129. Zeke, 133. Poor Amy, 137. Manuel, 139. Slaveholders mollified, 145. The United States Bond, 149. The tender mercies of a Slaveholder, 157. The Foreign Slave, 160. The New-Jersey Slave, 164. A Slave Hunter Defeated, 168. Mary Morris, 173. The Slave Mother, 176. Colonel Ridgeley's Slave, 179. Stop Thief! 185. The Disguised Slaveholder, 189. The Slave of Dr. Rich, 192. His Knowledge of Law, 202. Mutual Confidence between him and the Colored People, 204. Mercy to Kidnappers, 206. Richard Allen, the Colored Bishop, 208. The Colored Guests at his Table, 210. Kane the Colored Man fined for Blasphemy, 211. John McGrier, 212. Levi Butler, 215. The Musical Boy, 217. Mary Norris, 22
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Marry Morris. (search)
t, industrious man, and had laid up some money. He offered one hundred and fifty dollars of his earnings to purchase the freedom of his wife. The sum was accepted, and the parties applied to Daniel Bussier, a magistrate in the District of Southwark, to draw up a deed of manumission. The money was paid, and the deed given; but the agent employed to sell the woman absconded with the money. The master, after waiting several months and not hearing from him, sent to Philadelphia and caused Mary Morris to be arrested again. She was taken to the office of Daniel Bussier, and notwithstanding he had witnessed her deed of manumission a few months before, he committed her to prison as a fugitive slave. When her husband called upon Isaac T. Hopper and related all the circumstances, he thought there must be some mistake; for he could not believe that any magistrate would be so unjust and arbitrary, as to commit a woman to prison as a fugitive, when he had seen the money paid for her ransom,