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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 3 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Morris or search for Thomas Morris in all documents.

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irst will including a bequest in aid of the Abolition cause. And here must not be omitted the name of John P. Hale, of New Hampshire, who was a candidate for the Presidency on the Liberty party ticket, and also a conspicuous member of the U. S. Senate. Going westward, we come to Ohio, which became, early in the movement, the dominating center of Abolitionist influence. Salmon P. Chase was there. James G. Birney, after being forced out of Kentucky, was there. Ex-United States Senator Thomas Morris, a candidate for the Vice-Presidency on the Liberty party ticket, was there. Leicester King and Samuel Lewis, Abolition candidates for the governorship of the State, were there. Joshua R. Giddings and United States Senator Ben. Wade were there. One great advantage the Ohio Abolitionists enjoyed was that they were harmonious and united. In the East that was not the case. There was a bitter feud between the Garrisonians, who relied on moral suasion, and the advocates of politica
te, 43; slavery contest, 67 ;andtheUnion, 159-160; Radicals, 159; Conservatives, 159; Charcoals, 159; Claybanks, 159; military control of, 163-166; guerrilla bands, 165; pacification of, 168; Radicals, opposition to Lincoln, in National Convention, 168-169; delegation to Lincoln, 169-171; Germans, attacks on, 181-182; loyalty of, 182-183. Missouri Democrat, The, 157-158; and Louis Snyder, 158-159; opposition to Lincoln, 180; support of Johnson, 180. Monroe, James, 205. Moody, Loring, 205. Morris, Senator, 205. Mott, Mrs. Lucretia, 38, 102-103. Mott, James, 203. N National Anti-Slavery Advocate, 204. National Era, The, 0000, 207-208. Negroes, prejudice against, in North, 35; in Ohio, 36; stronger in North than in South, 36; suffrage, 80; failure as freemen, 80-81. Newcomb, Stillman E., 201. Nicolay, J. C., 136. Nigger Hill, 26, 73. Nigger-pens, 31. Noyes, 179. O Oberlin College, 207. O'Connell, Daniel, 131. Ohio, pro-slavery, 21; Abolitionists of, 21. Opdyke, 179.