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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George Morrison or search for George Morrison in all documents.

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igade. The strength of the enemy opposed to us has not been satisfactorily ascertained. The prisoners assert that Longstreet's division and part of Huger's were in the field. It is probable, as we know that Longstreet's and Huger's divisions, supported by Hill's corps, hold that line. We lost no prominent field-officers, but many line-officers were wounded — several killed. Two of Hooker's aids had horses killed under them, and Lieut. Whiting, aid to Gen. Robinson, lost an arm. Colonel Morrison, a volunteer aid, was also wounded. The most painful misfortune of the day was the mortal wounding of Lieut. Bullock, of the Seventh Massachusetts, who was struck in the back by a fragment of one of our own shells, while he was leading his company to support the battery. Massachusetts again suffered heavily. The First regiment lost ten killed and one hundred and nineteen wounded; the Seventh, two killed, fourteen wounded; the Eleventh and Sixteenth suffered somewhat, and the Nineteen
which was poured in upon us from every side. I think it beyond doubt one of the most sanguinary conflicts of the war, considering the numbers engaged. Rev. George Morrison, of this place, rendered me very important service, before and after the engagement, in conveying orders to the different commands under me. It is quitet lung; Jacob Carver, Co. E, Eighteenth Kentucky, thigh amputated; John Scott, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, thigh; Chas. Tait, Thirty-fourth Ohio, both thighs; Rev. Geo. Morrison, Home Guards, ankle, very slight; Wm. Sanders, Newport Home Guards, right thigh; James Little, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, right lung; Christian Ledren, Home uard, left lung. J. Carver, thigh amputated. Geo. Scott, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, wounded, thigh. Charles Tate, Thirty-fourth Ohio, both thighs. Rev. Mr. Morrison, Home Guard, ankle. William Sanders, Home Guard, right thigh. James Little, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, right lung. Christian Ledger, Home Guard, shou
ions to Captain Biddle for valuable suggestions in relation to the posting and arranging of the artillery. I am under great obligations to the gallant Lieutenant Wickliffe Cooper, Dr. Irwin, Captains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy say they had about twelve thousand infantry, four thousand cavalry, and fifteen pieces of artillery, who were all veteran troops, most of them having been in the army since the commencement of the war. Their loss in killed was about two hundred and fifty, and in wounded not over five hundred. The Union
ions to Captain Biddle for valuable suggestions in relation to the posting and arranging of the artillery. I am under great obligations to the gallant Lieutenant Wickliffe Cooper, Dr. Irwin, Captains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy say they had about twelve thousand infantry, four thousand cavalry, and fifteen pieces of artillery, who were all veteran troops, most of them having been in the army since the commencement of the war. Their loss in killed was about two hundred and fifty, and in wounded not over five hundred. The Union