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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Lesley G. Morrow or search for Lesley G. Morrow in all documents.

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ition of coolness and bravery. Acting Master D. C. Kells, Acting Ensigns Pease and Miner, and Acting Master's Mates Tuttle and Delano, I would also recommend to your favorable notice for their good conduct under the fire of the enemy. Mr. Buehler, First Assistant Engineer and Acting Chief, managed the Engineer's department in a highly creditable manner, in which he was sustained by the Assistant-Engineers Greenleaf, Scot, Burns, and Weecker. Acting Assistant-Paymaster Kitchen and Lesley G. Morrow, Captain's Clerk, remained on deck during the action, and contributed their parts to my entire satisfaction. Acting Assistant-Surgeon George P. Wright not only attended to our three cases of wounded, (one mortally,) but gave his professional services to the Oneida, to several of their wounded who came on board of this steamer. The crew manifested the utmost courage throughout the affair, which will always reflect creditably upon you and the Navy of the United States. Very respect
g Creek, and Town Creek, and also that one of Roddy's regiments was foraging on the north side of the Tennessee River, he immediately informed General Grant of these movements of the enemy, who directed me to organize an expedition at once, of sufficient force to drive Roddy away from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and materials that might in any way be used by the enemy in crossing the Tennessee River. On the twenty-second, information was received that Johnson's and Morrow's brigades, of Roddy's command, had crossed the Tennessee, somewhere between Florence and Clifton, on the eighteenth, intending to make a raid on our railroads. The guards along the railroads were cautioned against an attack from this party, and measures were immediately taken to drive Roddy across the river. Colonel H. O. Miller, Seventy-second Indiana, commanding one expedition, reports from Blue Water, twenty-sixth, via Pulaski, twenty-seventh, that he engaged Johnson's brigade near Flo