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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 1 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
nter-revolution had been postponed to a more propitious time. It was now the spontaneous uprising of the loyal people. News of this sudden and formidable invasion had reached Indianapolis, the capital of the State, on the 9th. July, 1868. Governor Morton See page 455, volume I. instantly issued a call for all the citizens to seize arms and turn out in a body to expel the intruders. The response was wonderful, and thrilled the loyal people of the country with joy, for it revealed the amazrmed recruits, and burnt the train. struck the river at Buffington Ford, a short distance above Pomeroy, where the stream is divided by Buffington Island. His situation had been growing more critical every hour. Governor Tod, of Ohio, like Governor Morton, of Indiana, had summoned the people to arms, and the uprising of the loyal inhabitants was like that of the sister State on the west, and with like effect upon the friends and foes of the Government. The people did all they could to assist
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
pursuit by the Nationals, 169. battle of Ringgold end of the campaign against Bragg, 170. In returning to Chattanooga, Rosecrans commenced the formidable line of fortifications around that town, under the skillful directions of General James St. Clair Morton, of the engineers, which excited the admiration of all; and within twenty-four hours after the army moved from Rossville, it was strongly intrenched — so strongly that Bragg could not, with safety, make a direct attack upon it. He did part. Finally, on the 16th, when he knew that Sherman's ammunition had arrived, he prepared for a speedy departure, and that night July 16, 17. he hurried across the Pearl River, burning the bridges behind him, and pushed on through Brandon to Morton. Sherman's loss in the recapture of Jackson, excepting Lauman's troops, was trifling. Johnston reported his loss in Jackson at about 600, and added that on his retreat desertions were frequent. Sherman did not pursue in force beyond the forme
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
nder Captain Foster (Fourth Ohio, of McPherson's body-guard); two pioneer corps, and seven batteries of light artillery. His whole force was in light marching order, and prepared for quick movements. He marched in the advance with McPherson's corps. He crossed the Big Black at the old railway bridge, skirmished some, and reached Jackson on the 6th Feb., 1864. There he crossed the Pearl River, on pontoons left by the Confederates in their hasty flight, and advanced rapidly through Brandon, Morton, and other towns on the line of the railway, and reached Meridian, on the eastern borders of the State of Mississippi, at the middle of the month, driving General Polk across the Tombigbee, some distance eastward of that town. Notwithstanding the Bishop had nine thousand infantry, under Generals French and Loring, and half that number of cavalry, under S. D. Lee, Wirt Adams, and Ferguson, he did not make a serious stand anywhere. Sherman's object being the infliction of as much injury up
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
Senate. Its decision was given on the 26th of the same month. Every member of the Senate was present, and voted. Thirty-five pronounced the President guilty, and nineteen declared him not guilty. He escaped legal conviction by one vote. The vote of the Senate was as follows:-- For Conviction--Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Howard, Howe, Morgan, Morrill of Vermont, Morrill of Maine, Morton, Nye, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson and Yates. These were all Republicans. For Acquittal--Messrs. Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Fowler, Grimes, Henderson, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Norton, Patterson of Tennessee, Ross, Saulsbury, Trumbull, Van Winkle and Vickers. Eight of these, namely: Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Saulsbury and Vickers,
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
on it as childish. February 7, 1864 It is one in the morning and I have, so to speak, just taken a midnight dinner, having come in from the front between 11 and 12 oclock. Well, who would have thought of marching out of comfortable winter quarters, to go poking round the Rapidan! . . . Only last night orders were suddenly issued to the 1st and 2d Corps to march at sunrise, the one on Raccoon, the other on Morton's Ford; where they were to make a strong demonstration and perhaps cross at Morton's (Raccoon being too strong). Certain cavalry, also, were to go to other points, with special orders. The whole thing was very sudden, all round, and none of our fish. This morning we took an early breakfast, which, with the ready horses, quite reminded one of campaigning times. General Sedgwick was over, being in command, as viceroy. At 10.30 we began to hear the cannon, but General Humphreys would not stir, as he said he must stay to attend to the despatches and telegraph. However, at
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ie's division attacked and took a third line, beyond the one taken by Potter. This could have been held, I think, but for the idea that we were to advance still more, so that preparations were made to push on instead of getting reserves in position to support the advanced force. The enemy, however, after dark, concentrated and again drove out our troops, who fell back to the work taken by Potter in the morning; and so ended the anniversary of Bunker Hill. In the attack of that evening, Major Morton, Chief Engineer of the 9th Corps, was killed — a man of an eccentric disposition, but of much ability. He was son of the celebrated ethnologist, whose unrivaled collection of crania is now in the Philadelphia Academy. June 18, 1864 A general attack was planned for an early hour, so Headquarters, which had lain down late, had scarce a chance to turn over once before it was routed out again, just at daylight. The General was in a tearing humor. (I don't think anybody felt any too ple
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
on Appleton, 150, 292, 322, 331, 337, 338. Milford, 119. Miller, Theodore, 324. Miller, William DeWitt, 225. Mills, Charles James, 233, 332, 338. Milroy's weary boys, 98. Mine Run, 55, 68. Mitchell, John Fulton Berrien, 48. Mitchell, William Galbraith, 82, 92, 134, 150, 226, 233, 253, 288. Moncure house, 122. Monocacy Bridge, 185. Montbarthe, Vicomte de, 254. Morale, in army, 115, 179. Morgan, Charles Hale, 233, 288. Morris, William Hopkins, 67. Morris, —, 312. Morton, James St. Clair, 167. Morton, Samuel George, 167. Morton's Ford, 68, 69. Mott, Gershom, 92, 93, 95, 108, 109, 217, 337. Mott's division, misconduct, 92, 93, 95, 109, 110n, 114, 208, 252, 294. Mt. Carmel Church, 122. Namozine road, 342, 346. Negro, Virginia, 67; free and slave, 74; troops, 102, 162, 180, 256, 262; aunty, 183; Petersburg mine, 199, 214; burying Rebel dead, 203n; arming southern, 245; poker game, 269. Nesmith, James Willis, 280; on Bull Run, 284. New London, Conn., 2
mmands which deserve special mention for distinguished service in the battle is the pioneer corps, a body of one thousand seven hundred men, composed of details from the companies of each infantry regiment, organized and instructed by Captain James St. Clair Morton, Corps of Engineers, Chief-Engineer of this army; which marched as an infantry brigade to the left wing, making bridges at Stuart's Creek; prepared and guarded the ford at Stone River on the night of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth; sud, its gallant behavior in action, the eminent service it is continually rendering the army, entitle both officers and men to special public notice and thanks, while they reflect the highest credit on the distinguished ability and capacity of Captain Morton, who will do honor to his promotion to a Brigadier-General, which the President has promised him. The ability, order and method exhibited in the management of the wounded elicited the warmest commendation from all our general officers, in
ebel cavalry. Captain (now Brigadier-General) Morton was ordered, soon afterward, to take position fire, with canister, and drove them back. Captain Morton, at the personal order of General Rosecranbattle. Toward sunset the enemy appeared on Morton's left. Two sections of Stokes' battery were d. Their dead were left within fifty paces of Morton's lines. The troops behaved admirably. Thegap between it and the Murfreesboro turnpike. Morton immediately changed front and occupied the gapd the pioneers to the left as reinforcements. Morton marched his command at double-quick, and arrivwas culminating. General Negley now requested Morton to reinforce him, and the pioneers were at onces of inclement weather and rebel fire. Captain Morton eulogized the conduct of the artillerymen General, and won high encomiums from him. Captain Morton, in his report, says: As the commanding Gep with his Eighth Indiana battery; meeting Captain Morton with his brigade of pioneers, he asked for[1 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morton, James St. Clair 1851- (search)
Morton, James St. Clair 1851- Military officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 24, 1S29; graduated at West Point in 1851: and was employed by Congress to explore a railroad route across the Isthmus, in Central America, through the Chiriqui country in 1860. He superintended the fortifying of the Tortugas in March, 1861, and was made chief engineer of the Army of the Ohio in May, 1862. Rosecrans placed him in command of the pioneer brigade late in that year, and he rendered efficient serng of the Tortugas in March, 1861, and was made chief engineer of the Army of the Ohio in May, 1862. Rosecrans placed him in command of the pioneer brigade late in that year, and he rendered efficient service in the battle of Stone River. He was wounded at Chickamauga; was chief engineer of the 9th Army Corps in the Richmond campaign in 1864; and was killed while leading an attack on Petersburg, June 17, 1864. General Morton was author of a Manual on fortifications and other engineering works.