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ky devolved on Lieut.-Col. J. C. Evans, who stood firmly at his post in the trying hour, and our favorite, Adjutant Scott Dudley, unconscious of self, stood up boldly, cheering the boys by example to stand firm and be quiet, while the sky seemed full of blue streaks from bursting bombs. Favorable mention should be made of the following soldiers, who resisted the enemy in the first onset, namely: Sergeant J. Frank Morton, privates R. B. Chism, J. P. Hagan, B. S. Jones, W. W. Oliver, and John Morton, of company F; Corporal Henry Stahel, privates Jno. Kiger, Cassius Kiger, (slightly wounded,) Geo. Montjoy, Ed. Welsh, and Wm. Murphy, (wounded in the thigh badly,) of company A, Twenty-first Kentucky. Below I furnish a complete list of the casualties of each regiment: Thirty-Fifth Indiana--killed--Adjt. Bernard R. Mullen, private Cormick Conohan. Wounded--Lieut.-Col. John E. Bolfe, badly, privates Andrew Hays, badly, William O'Donnell, Thomas Burke, slightly, Chas. F. Reese, Mike
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
tationed on the opposite side of the river. Morton's orders from General Forrest were to open witg aloft his sword, cried out, Three cheers for Morton's Artillery! Quickly other boats were afire. wing bringing with them by hand the section of Morton's battery--Lieutenant Brown commanding — from oughout the night. On the following morning Morton accompanied General Forrest back to the river,icuous gallantry. No list could be had except Morton's battery. This account of the operations oe them, and fails to mention the fact that Captain Morton was chief of artillery or was present duri are as hereinbefore set forth. The guns were Morton's guns, under his immediate orders and controlun, etc., etc., etc. Now, the fact is, when Morton selected the new position and opened the fightrs of a mile down the river, and did not reach Morton's position until the transports and gunboats we afire, when he brought the two other guns of Morton's battery and took position alongside of Zarri[9 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence. (search)
Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry. Rhode Island, Etc. Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery. Connecticut. Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott. New York. William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris. New Jersey. Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark. North Carolina. William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn. Georgia. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton. Pennsylvania. Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamiin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, William Paca, George Ross. Delaware. Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean. Maryland. Samuel Chase, James Wilson, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton. Virginia. George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton. South Carolina. Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morton, John 1724-1777 (search)
Morton, John 1724-1777 A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Ridley, Pa., in 1724; was of Swedish descent. A welleducated man, he was for many years member of the Assembly of Pennsylvania, and its speaker from 1772 to 1775. He Levi Parsons Morton. was a delegate to the Stamp act Congress (q. v.) in 1765, and became a judge of the Supreme Court of the province. Mr. Morton was a member of the Continental Congress from 1774 to 1776, and voted for the Declaration of Independence. He assisted in the first formation of the Articles of Confederation, and died in April, 1777.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stamp act Congress, the (search)
enville's obnoxious scheme of taxation. It was organized by the choice of Timothy Ruggles, of Massachusetts, chairman, and John Cotten, clerk. The following representatives presented their credentials: Massachusetts—James Otis, Oliver Partridge, Timothy Ruggles. New York—Robert R. Livingston, John Cruger, Philip Livingston, William Bayard, Leonard Lispenard. New Jersey—Robert Ogden, Hendrick Fisher, Joseph Borden. Rhode Island—Metcalf Bowler, Henry Ward. Pennsylvania—John Dickinson, John Morton, George Bryan. Delaware— Thomas McKean, Caesar Rodney, Connecticut—Eliphalet Dyer, David Rowland, William S. Johnson. Maryland—William Murdock, Edward Tilghman, Thomas Ringgold. South Carolina—Thomas Lynch, Christopher Gadsden, John Rutledge. The Congress continued in session fourteen consecutive days, and adopted a Declaration of rights, written by John Cruger, a Petition to the King, written by Robert R. Livingston, and a Memorial to both Houses of Parliament, written by J
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thurman, Allen Granbery 1813-1895 (search)
Thurman, Allen Granbery 1813-1895 Statesman; born in Lynchburg, Va., Nov. 13, 1813; practised law in Chillicothe, O., and became eminent at the bar; was a life-long Democrat. In 1845-47 he represented Ohio in the national House of Representatives, and in 1851-55 was a judge of the State Supreme Court. In 1867 he was the candidate for governor in opposition to Rutherford B. Hayes, and the campaign was close and exciting, though Hayes won. During two terms, 1869 to 1881, Thurman was a member of the United States Senate, where he served on the judiciary committee and on the electoral commission of 1877, and was a leader of the party and an authority on constitutional questions. He had been a candidate for the Presidential nomination, and in 1888 he accepted the second place on the ticket with Grover Cleveland. In the election Cleveland and Thurman were defeated by Harrison and Morton. Senator Thurman died in Columbus, O., Dec. 12, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ac Low 16. John Alsop 17. John Herring 18. Simon Boerum 19. Henry Wisuer 20. Col. William FloydCounty of Suffolk in province of New York.July 28, 1774 Delegates to the first Continental Congress—Continued. Delegates.State Represented.Credentials Signed. 21. James KinseyNew JerseyJuly 23, 1774 22. John De Hart 23. Richard Smith 24. William Livingston 25. Stephen Crane 26. Hon. Joseph GallowayPennsylvaniaJuly 22, 1774 27. Samuel Rhodes 28. Thomas Mifflin 29. John Morton 30. Charles Humphreys 31. Edward Biddle 32. George Ross 33. John Dickinson 34. Hon. Caesar RodneyNew Castle, Kent, and Sussex on the DelawareAug. 1, 1774 35. Thomas McKean 36. George Read 37. Robert GoldsboroughMarylandJune 22, 1774 38. William Paca 39. Samuel Chase 40. Thomas Johnson 41. Matthew Tilghman 42. Hon. Peyton RandolphVirginiaAug. 5, 1774 43. Patrick Henry 44. Benjamin Harrison 45. George Washington 46. Richard Bland 47. Edmund Pendleton 48.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers, and soldiers who died as prisoners. (search)
ville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Morse, George E., Sergt.,19th Mass. Inf.,Florence, S. C.,Aug. 21, 1864. Morse, Herbert C.,12th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,March 13, 1864. Morse, James K.,20th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Dec. 28, 1864. Morse, Solon E., Corp.,35th Mass. Inf.,Belle Isle, Va.,March 1, 1864. Mortimer, Louis,19th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 23, 1864. Morton, Emory P.,27th Mass. Inf.,Millen, Ga.,Oct.--, 1864. Morton, G. H.,*42d Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 9, 1864. Morton, John,34th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 11, 1864. Moulton, Harrison,20th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Jan. 25, 1865. Moulton, Harrison, Error for Moulton, Harrison, transferred from 15th to 20th.15th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Jan. 24, 1865. Moulton, J. F., Sergt.,25th Mass. Inf.,Charleston, S. C.,Oct. 6, 1864. Mullen, John,18th Mass. Inf.,Annapolis, Md.,Feb. 5, 1863. Mulley, Patrick,*58th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 24, 1864. Mulligan, B.,*11th Mass. Inf.,Florence, S.
ville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Morse, George E., Sergt.,19th Mass. Inf.,Florence, S. C.,Aug. 21, 1864. Morse, Herbert C.,12th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,March 13, 1864. Morse, James K.,20th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Dec. 28, 1864. Morse, Solon E., Corp.,35th Mass. Inf.,Belle Isle, Va.,March 1, 1864. Mortimer, Louis,19th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 23, 1864. Morton, Emory P.,27th Mass. Inf.,Millen, Ga.,Oct.--, 1864. Morton, G. H.,*42d Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 9, 1864. Morton, John,34th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 11, 1864. Moulton, Harrison,20th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Jan. 25, 1865. Moulton, Harrison, Error for Moulton, Harrison, transferred from 15th to 20th.15th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Jan. 24, 1865. Moulton, J. F., Sergt.,25th Mass. Inf.,Charleston, S. C.,Oct. 6, 1864. Mullen, John,18th Mass. Inf.,Annapolis, Md.,Feb. 5, 1863. Mulley, Patrick,*58th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 24, 1864. Mulligan, B.,*11th Mass. Inf.,Florence, S.
Mass. Inf., 397 Morse, D. S., 397 Morse, E. P., 397 Morse, G. E., 537 Morse, G. H., 470 Morse, G. J., 120, 397 Morse, H. C., 537 Morse, H. F., 254 Morse, J. K., 537 Morse, Luther, 397 Morse, M. S., 470 Morse, R. E., 470 Morse, S. E., 537 Morse, S. G., 397 Morse, Samuel, 123, 397 Mortimer, C. C. E., 54, 470 Mortimer, George, 397 Mortimer, Louis, 537 Morton, E. P., 537 Morton, Frederick, 397 Morton, Fuller, 493 Morton, G. E., 397 Morton, G. H., 537 Morton, J. W., 164 Morton, John, 537 Morton, L. B., 397 Mosher, C. W., 397 Mosher, E. N., 397 Mosher, Philip, 563 Mosher, W. H., 397 Mosier, Demas, 470 Mosier, L. M., 470 Mott, Ellis, 192 Moule, G. H., 65 Moulton, E. C., 397 Moulton, Harrison, 537 Moulton, J. F., 537 Moulton, Lyman, 397 Moulton, Orson, 121 Mower, Livingston, 493 Moylan, Richard, 397 Mudge, C. R., 96, 99, 101, 397 Mudge, W. P., 105, 397 Mudgett, I. N., 315 Mulcahey, David, 470 Mulcahey, James, 397 Mullen, Bernard, 28th Mass. Inf., 4
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