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to take advantage of these favorable designs of the enemy. On retiring to Chattanooga, instead of placing the Tennessee between his forces and those of the rebels, he immediately called around him his generals, and in a few words explained to them his future intended plans. This place is to be held at all hazards; we here make the big fight, be the strength of the enemy what it may. Beyond this point the army of the Cumberland will not retire while there is a foe to menace it! General St. Clair Morton, Chief of Engineers, immediately set about to put the place in a defensible condition for the warm welcome of the enemy. The Nationals at present occupy the works previously constructed by the rebels to prevent the approach of the Yankees. The former strength of these works the enemy know full well. But they have now been made more complete, enlarged and improved upon by those whose approach they were first intended to resist. The enemy have been constantly moving around u
from a thicket, it was interrupted by the General, and re-formed by members of his staff. Stokes's battery advanced rapidly across the road, supported by Capt. St. Clair Morton's battalions of pioneers — men selected from all regiments for their vigor and mechanical skill. The fire was desperately hot, but the General saw only a broken line which he determined to rally. The battery was planted on a little knoll, with its flanks protected by thickets, and Morton deployed his pioneers on either side. The battery opened briskly, and Morton led his battalion beautifully to the front. The enemy, suddenly checked by the murderous fire, staggered and fell baMorton led his battalion beautifully to the front. The enemy, suddenly checked by the murderous fire, staggered and fell back swiftly, sheltering themselves in friendly forests. And so, along the whole line, the enemy was pressed backward. The day was saved. No man disputes that the personal exertions of General Rosecrans retrieved the fortunes of the morning. At about two o'clock the enemy were discovered right and left of the Murfreesboro pike
Point Railroad, at the extreme right of the Federal line. It was one of the earliest forts completed, being built in July, 1864. Fort Morton, named after Major St. Clair Morton, killed by a sharpshooter's bullet in July, 1864, was renowned as the place from which the mine was dug and from which the disastrous attempt to break thrncoming mass of humanity broke through the first line of Nashville. Shortly after the occupation of Nashville by the Union forces in February, 1862, General Morton, of the U. S. Corps of Engineers, began work on its fortifications. Around the capitol were built earth parapets and stockades, and enough room was provided y Morton and Houston Hills, and a third on which Fort Negley was actually constructed. The pictures show the city which the works were built to defend, but which Morton was prepared to leave to the enemy if forced to retreat within his lines. A state house stockaded The stockade and the parapet The Nashville capitol fort
artillery and musketry fire directed on them from both flanks and from the rear at daylight. What was left of this brave division, shattered and broken, drifted back to their own line. It was the forlorn hope of Lee's beleaguered army. Fort McGilvery was less than one-half a mile from the Appomattox River, just north of the city Point Railroad, at the extreme right of the Federal line. It was one of the earliest forts completed, being built in July, 1864. Fort Morton, named after Major St. Clair Morton, killed by a sharpshooter's bullet in July, 1864, was renowned as the place from which the mine was dug and from which the disastrous attempt to break through the Confederate lines was made on July 30th. Fort Morton lay almost in the center of the most active portion of the lines, and was about a mile south of Fort Stedman. Where Gordon's men attacked, Fort Stedman The powder magazine at Fort McGilvery Fort Morton, opposite the crater Siege of Petersburg. almost ev
l line were silent. They dare not fire on their own routed men. The weight of the oncoming mass of humanity broke through the first line of Nashville. Shortly after the occupation of Nashville by the Union forces in February, 1862, General Morton, of the U. S. Corps of Engineers, began work on its fortifications. Around the capitol were built earth parapets and stockades, and enough room was provided to mount fifteen guns. The strong, massive structure, plentifully supplied with watas but a part of the entire line of defenses he planned. He was intending to fortify Morton and Houston Hills, and a third on which Fort Negley was actually constructed. The pictures show the city which the works were built to defend, but which Morton was prepared to leave to the enemy if forced to retreat within his lines. A state house stockaded The stockade and the parapet The Nashville capitol fortified Federal infantry. The center of the Union front had been pierced. Like a
o take advantage of these favorable designs of the enemy. On returning to Chattanooga, instead of placing the Tennessee between his forces and those of the rebels, he immediately called around him his Generals, and in a few words explained to them his future intended plans. This place is to be held at all hazards; we here make the big fight, be the strength of the enemy what it may! Beyond this point the Army of the Cumberland will not retire while there is a foe to menace it. Gen. St. Clair Morton, chief of engineers, immediately set about to put the place in a defensible condition for the warm welcome of the enemy. The nationals at present occupy the works previously constructed by the rebels to prevent the approach of the Yankees. The former strength of these works the enemy know full well. But they have now been made more complete, enlarged, and improved upon by those for whose approach they were first intended to resist; and should the enemy desire to learn more of