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James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 9 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John W. Morton or search for John W. Morton in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
ls which needed development, including the making of sulphuric and nitric acids; which latter we had to manufacture to insure a supply of fulmirate of mercury for our percussion caps. To give an idea of the extent of the duty thus performed: Colonel Morton, Chief of the Nitre and Mining Bureau, after the transfer of General St. John, writes: We were aiding and managing some twenty to thirty furnaces, with an annual yield of 50,000 tons or more of pig metal. We had erected lead and copper smelul! Rains, St. John, Mallet, Burton, Wright, White, Baldwin, Rhett, Ellicott, Andrews, Childs, DeLagnel, Hutter, and others, who would have remained in the service. Then there were some no less admirable, like LeRoy Broun, Allan, Wiley Browne, Morton, Colston, Bayne, Cuyler, E. B. Smith, &c., who would doubtless have returned to their civil avocations. Among the obvious necessities of a well-regulated service, was one large, central laboratory, where all ammunition should be made—thus secu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
produced by the lixiviation of nitrous earth dug from under old houses, barns, &c. The nitre production thus organized, there was added to the Nitre Bureau the duty of supervising the production of iron, lead, copper, and, in fine, all the minerals which needed development, including the making of sulphuric and nitric acids; which latter we had to manufacture to insure a supply of fulmirate of mercury for our percussion caps. To give an idea of the extent of the duty thus performed: Colonel Morton, Chief of the Nitre and Mining Bureau, after the transfer of General St. John, writes: We were aiding and managing some twenty to thirty furnaces, with an annual yield of 50,000 tons or more of pig metal. We had erected lead and copper smelting furnaces [at Petersburg, before referred to] with a capacity sufficient for all our wants, and had succeeded in smelting zinc of good quality at the same place. The Chemical Works were placed at Charlotte, N. C., where a pretty large leaden cha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Central laboratory. (search)
I attribute much of the improvement in our ammunition to this happy selection. A more earnest and capable officer I cannot imagine. What a set of men we would have had after the war out of which to form an Ordnance Department, had we been successful! Rains, St. John, Mallet, Burton, Wright, White, Baldwin, Rhett, Ellicott, Andrews, Childs, DeLagnel, Hutter, and others, who would have remained in the service. Then there were some no less admirable, like LeRoy Broun, Allan, Wiley Browne, Morton, Colston, Bayne, Cuyler, E. B. Smith, &c., who would doubtless have returned to their civil avocations. Among the obvious necessities of a well-regulated service, was one large, central laboratory, where all ammunition should be made—thus securing absolute uniformity where uniformity was vital. The policy of dissemination so necessary to husband our transportation, and to utilize the labor of non-combatants, must here yield to the greater necessity of obtaining our ammunition uniform in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
on McGinnis. Ninth Tennessee, Colonel J. B. Biffle. Tenth Tennessee, Colonel N. N. Cox. Eleventh Tennessee, Colonel D. W. Holman. Shaw's (or Hamilton's) Battalion(?), Major J. Shaw. Freeman's (Tennessee) Battery, Captain A. L. Huggins. Morton's (Tennessee) Battery, Captain John W. Morton. Pegram's division. taken from Pegram's and Scott's reports and assignments, but the composition of this division is uncertain. Brigadier-General John Pegram. Davidson's brigade. BrigadCaptain John W. Morton. Pegram's division. taken from Pegram's and Scott's reports and assignments, but the composition of this division is uncertain. Brigadier-General John Pegram. Davidson's brigade. Brigadier-General H. B. Davidson. First Georgia. Sixth Georgia, Colonel John R. Hart. Sixth North Carolina. Rucker's Legion. Huwald's (Tennessee) Battery. Scott's brigade. Colonel J. S. Scott. Tenth Confederate, Colonel C. T. Goode. Detachment of Morgan's command, Lieutenant-Colonel R. M. Martin. First Louisiana. Second Tennessee. Fifth Tennessee. Twelfth Tennessee Battalion. Sixteenth Tennessee Battalion, Captain J. Q. Arnold. Louisiana Battery, (one section.)
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina— administration of D. H. Chamberlain. (search)
hat he ought to receive their support at the next election for Governor; nay, so decidedly had he won the people that Senator Morton raised the cry of alarm and charged him with having deserted his party and courting the Democrats. To this malignantminent candidates to represent the State at large, and both factions were arranging their forces to meet the crisis. Senator Morton had denounced Chamberlain for courting the Democrats. He felt that his position was insecure and that he needed all t a true man. Judge Carpenter had shown that his word was not to be depended upon. He was too anxious to stand well with Morton, and he too evidently stood in awe of Grant. He was a man of culture—knew what the world held highest, and perhaps in hiical support. He might set at defiance Whipper and Elliott, negroes whom he despised, but he could not bear the frown of Morton, nor brook the rude displeasure of Grant. All this was known even to those who were willing to stand by him, but what ho