Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John S. Mosby or search for John S. Mosby in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
o General Stuart. In a note on page 203, Col. Mosby says: My criticism of General Lee's refect a junction with Ewell at that point. Col. Mosby is mistaken in saying that General Lee's repcts from the reports, hereinafter quoted. Col. Mosby's statement that General Lee's report is unfit impossible to obtain accurate information. Mosby says in answer to this that the cavalry, with battle. Lee's instruction to Stuart. Col. Mosby says (page 72), that General Stuart rode to e army. I have not heard from him since. Col. Mosby says (page 88), that this letter settles a qof which Stuart was advised as above stated, Col. Mosby says (page 103): This premature movem Stuart's cavalry and lack of information; but Mosby elsewhere repeatedly denies that it was the abhad brought. The information obtained by Col. Mosby on the 23rd and communicated to General Stuattysburg. It is a pleasure to concur with Col. Mosby, when he says, on page 59: As the Chi[22 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Black Eagle Company. (search)
John M. Spencer, of Buckingham county, Va. Spencer was too young at the beginning of the hostilities to be enrolled as a soldier, but being very patriotic, he volunteered his services with the color guard of the Black Eagle Company for the battle of Seven Pines, Va. He passed through that baptism of fire and leaden hail unscathed, which nerved him to try his luck again at Gaines' Mill, Va. He was more fortunate this time when he received his mark of honor: was wounded and afterwards joined Mosby's command; was captured and confined at Fort Warren, Mass., till the cruel war was over, and is now living at Berkley, California, as patriotic as ever—a good old rebel yet. The Black Eagle Company was mustered into service with sixty members, twenty-two of whom were killed in battle, twenty-two wounded, two died of disease contracted in camp, seven were exempted (too old at that time for the service, in 1862, the Confederate Congress at that time made that provision for them), six were r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ly before the passage of the Potomac. Colonel John S. Mosby in his book recently published, entitlgh the middle of Hooker's army into Maryland. Mosby was a great favorite with Stuart, and had freqas to assail Hooker's, &c. According to Colonel Mosby, Stuart told him that Lee was anxious to k24th, who was to forward it to Lee. Stuart and Mosby then arranged that the latter should again crouart the next day at a designated point, where Mosby would guide the advance as it moved on throughting at the appointed place between Stuart and Mosby never took place. Stuart found Hooker's army w, the better. The information referred to by Mosby, as given by him to Stuart, if forwarded by thnment to the command of the Federal army. Colonel Mosby has pointed out the extreme improbability, the battle piecemeal. On the other hand, Colonel Mosby fiercely assails Hill in having departed fdivision. As to the first point made by Colonel Mosby, that Cashtown and not Gettysburg was the [1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
says it was between 1 and 2 A. M. From this Col. Mosby infers they must have started on the evening the fact was really known on the 27th. Colonel Mosby's whole argument on this point hinges on ten ordered to move against Harrisburg; yet Colonel Mosby asserts that Lee had no such plan, though d not carry out those instructions? Now Colonel Mosby here puts a gloss on the record, and repre In his zeal to justify General Stuart, Colonel Mosby has misread and so mis-stated the records.nd himself after he parted with General Lee. Col. Mosby says Gen. Lee had studied astronomy and knewnsistencies Col. Mosby alleges disappear. Col. Mosby is of opinion that the scout who came in at e easily rent asunder by the ipse dixil of Colonel Mosby. What appears conclusive proof to ColonelColonel Mosby that the story of the scout is a myth is the statement, in after years coupled with it, thatStuart with the larger part of the cavalry. Col. Mosby knows better—Lee had all the cavalry that he[41 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Eighth Virginia's part in second Manassas. (search)
en. Under less serious circumstances the race would have been amusing, but as they ran far ahead of the regiment, several were struck going over the field. One man, Dave Hixson, was shot through the foot as he ran. We lost a good man in him, but Mosby gained one. Jenkins presently changed direction to the left, intending, I suppose, to take a battery that had an enfilading fire on him. He came up on us, and as my men, having given up the chase, they joined his left. But very soon the batten. Under less serious circumstances the race would have been amusing, but as they ran far ahead of the regiment, several were struck going over the field. One man, Dave Hixson, was shot through the foot as he ran. We lost a good man in him, but Mosby gained one. Jenkins presently changed direction to the left, intending, I suppose, to take a battery that had an enfilading fire on him. He came up on us, and as my men, having given up the chase, they joined the left. But very soon the batte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
A Participant in the most brilliant battle fought by Mosby's command. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch August 1, 1909. Replying to Captain W. L. White's inquiry in regard to the late Joseph Bryan's service as a soldier in Mosby's command, CMosby's command, Colonel Mosby writes as follows: Department of Justice, Washington, July 16, 1909. Mr. William L. White: Dear Sir:—Your letter of inquiry in reference to Joe Bryan just received. I do not remember the date when he joined me, but do know that iColonel Mosby writes as follows: Department of Justice, Washington, July 16, 1909. Mr. William L. White: Dear Sir:—Your letter of inquiry in reference to Joe Bryan just received. I do not remember the date when he joined me, but do know that in 1864 he was wounded in a fight near Upperville; that in 1864 he was detailed to watch in the Bull Run Mountain, when I was lying wounded in Fauquier, and that in February, 1865, he was in what I have always said was the most brilliant affair of my command, when Major Richards with thirty-seven men attacked and routed a Major Gibson with 150 men (Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry), killing, wounding and capturing nearly the whole force. I was then absent wounded. Very truly, John S. Mosby
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heth intended to cover his error. (search)
Heth intended to cover his error. Colonel John S. Mosby gives his version of New chapter in Lee-Stuart controversy. By Colonel John S. Mosby. The Times-Dispatch of February 20, at the request of Colonel T. M. R. Talcott publishes a letter written by General Heth over thirty years ago in reference to the manner in which he brought on the battle of Gettysburg without order from General Lee. Heth's letter was published in the Southern Historical Society Papers; but they did not publishColonel John S. Mosby. The Times-Dispatch of February 20, at the request of Colonel T. M. R. Talcott publishes a letter written by General Heth over thirty years ago in reference to the manner in which he brought on the battle of Gettysburg without order from General Lee. Heth's letter was published in the Southern Historical Society Papers; but they did not publish my reply. This is the way that history is manufactured in Richmond. I refer in my book, Stuart's Cavalry in the Gettysburg Campaign, to Heth's letter and quote it on pages 150-151-152-154. Heth gives an entirely different account in this letter of the way the battle was precipitated against orders by A. P. Hill and himself from both his own and Hill's official reports to General Lee. The latter says they went on July 1st after shoes: both reports say they went to make a reconnaissance
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Breathed, Jim, 25. Breckinridge, Gen. J. C., 247. Brehm Henry G., 266. Broun, Col. W Leroy, 16. Broun, Major Thos. L., 349. Brown, Col. J. Thompson, 64. Buchanan, Capt. 40. Bulloch, Capt., 49. Bryan, Joseph, his service in Mosby's Command, 348. Cabell, Gen. W. L. 255. Carey, Misses made Confederate flag, 256. Carter, Lt. Robert. 50. Carrington J. McDowell, 337. Cemetery Ridge, 150 Chambersburg, The burning of, 152, Christian, Col. C. B.. 236. Clay, Clin the C. S. Army, 235. Massey, Col. E. C., 164. Maury, Gen. D. H., 324. Meade, General, 104. Memorial Day, Origin of. 368. Memorial Sermon in Old St. John's Church, 338. Minor, Lieut. R. D., 50. Morrison. Col. E. M., 319. Mosby Col. John S., 21, 34, 210; Unjust strictures by, 230, 269. Munford's Marylauders never surrendered 309. Murdaugh, John D. 39. Murdaugh, Capt. Wm. H., 39. Nitre and Mining Bureau, 11. Oates, Col., of the 50th Ala., 128. O'Conor Ch