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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
the customary religious moralizing on fatalities overtaking those engaged in secular pursuits on Sunday. The conclusion ran thus: These remarks are made, not to encourage men to do Lib. 6.127. wrong at any time, but to controvert a pernicious and superstitious notion, and one that is very prevalent, that extraordinary and supernatural visitations of divine indignation upon certain transgressors (of the Sabbath, particularly and almost exclusively) are poured out now as in the days of Moses and the prophets. Whatever claim the Sabbath may have to a strict religious observance, we are confident it cannot be strengthened, but must necessarily be weakened, by all such attempts to enforce or prove its sanctity. Supposing the Fourth Commandment to be, not a Jewish provision merely, but obligatory upon all mankind, we are nowhere taught in the Bible that its violation is worse than that of the third, or fifth, or sixth, or seventh. But it is seldom pretended, even by the most cr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
Whenever my name was alluded to, a round of applause was sure to follow Tremendous applause was given when an ex-slave, a native of Africa, after reciting some horrible tales from his experience, turned suddenly to Mr. Garrison with—Dat man is de Moses raised up for our deliverance (Lib. 7.22).—which clearly demonstrated, not so much that any merit belongs to me, as that the meeting was deeply and thoroughly saturated with Garrisonism. Indeed, there was a great deal too much said in my praise that the clerical dissenters cannot take a single anti-slavery position but what Garrison holds the right of discovery and preoccupancy. The colored Lib. 7.154, 163, 178. citizens of Boston and Philadelphia rallied to uphold the arm of their Moses. We feel fully persuaded, said they of Lib. 7.178. the latter city, with singular felicity of diction, that the day cannot be far distant when you will be acknowledged —by the very lips of those who now denounce, revile, and persecute you as th<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
r might be thought of that man, it was useless . . . to deny to him either talent or influence. That man had powers capable of effecting mighty purposes. He had power to excite and direct the imaginations and passions of men. He was equal to efforts which go to the subversion of governments, and to effect great moral revolutions in society. Mr. Gurley had no doubt that this individual acted under an illusion cast about him by his own powerful imagination. His purpose, no doubt, was, like Moses or like Mahomet, to effect a great revolution in civil society, and to be the founder of a new basis of civil and social institutions. Compare Edmund Quincy's tribute to the same individual as one of those rare spirits which Heaven, at distant periods, sends upon the earth on holiest missions. . . . The only righteous in a world perverse (Speech on Jan. 26, 1838, before the Mass. A. S. Society in the Representatives' Hall of the State House; Lib. 8: 21, 22). This was complimentary in
wn, Goold [1791-1857], 1.287, 288. Brown, John [b. Torrington, Conn., May 9, 1800; d. Charlestown, Va., Dec. 2, 1859], 2.184.—Portrait in Webb's Life. Brown, Moses [b. Sept. 23, 738; d. Providence, R. I., Sept. 8, 1836], host of G., 1.286, 288. Brown, Nicholas, captain of Francis, 1.165; denounced by G., 1.166; kindness t, 349; doubts as to Collins's mission, 416.—Letters to S. J. May, 1.476, Henry Benson, 2.39, G., 2.52, E. M. Davis, 2.124, J. M. McKim, 2.159, 322. Burleigh, Cyrus Moses [b. Plainfield, Conn., Feb. 8, 1820; d. Sunnyside, Pa., Mar. 7, 1855], at N. Y. anniversary, 2.348, at Groton Convention, 421. Burleigh, Rinaldo [1774-1863],ouverneur, Samuel L., 1.493, 494. Graham, James Lorimer [1797-1876], 1.383. Graham, James Robert George [1792-1861], 1.379. Graham Journal, 2.223. Grant, Moses [1785-862], paper dealer (Grant & Daniell), 1.223; attends G.'s lecture, 212. Grattan, Henry and James, 1.379. Greele, Samuel [1783-1861], type-founder, 1.73