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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 31, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Mosher or search for Mosher in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
Farragut with his ship fast aground and a huge fire-raft held hard against her wooden side by the little Confederate tug Mosher. The ship seemed all ablaze and the men, breathing fire, were driven from their guns. Farragut, calmly pacing the poop-lip. The men, inspired by such coolness, leaped to their stations again and soon a shot pierced the boiler of the plucky Mosher and sank her. The men who dared — sailors on the Hartford after passing the New Orleans forts Spar-deck of the Harncoming ships. She struck the Mississippi, wounding her badly, and all but sank the Brooklyn. The men on the little tug Mosher, which pushed the fire-raft against the Hartford, sank with their vessel. Desperate deeds of courage were performed by ed by the time the flagship had worked off the bank and headed up the stream they were extinguished. The dauntless little Mosher received a broadside at close range and had sunk with all on board. It was an awe-inspiring sight. From the mortar ba