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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 2 2 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Mother Goose or search for Mother Goose in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
storian's last days; the duchess added a note, recalling how heartily he grasped Sumner's hand at their last meeting at Argyll Lodge. Motley wrote Sumner, Jan. 2, 1860: Do you remember the breakfast at Holly Lodge? This was the last time we had any of us the pleasure of meeting Macaulay, I believe. I am sure it was the last time that I saw him, and I am not likely to forget it very soon. Do you remember how gay and amusing he was after breakfast, in his library,—repeating ballads from Mother Goose, and quoting stanzas from Dante's Inferno in the same breath, and fighting Monckton Milnes about German poetry? Well, in that very room, and in the very arm-chair in which he then sat, he breathed his last, on Wednesday evening last, 28 December. For once Sumner came home for the Christmas and New Year holidays. While at home he was presented by James Freeman Clarke, George W. Bond. and others with an interesting souvenir,—a dessert service of knives and forks once belonging to L