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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 2 2 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Mother Goose or search for Mother Goose in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The case of the <rs>South</rs> against the <rs>North</rs>. [from New Orleans Picayune, December 30th, 1900.] (search)
the union. Mr. Grady observes that this was an unfortunate move, aside from any merit in it; it united against those who held Mr. Hayne's opinions many of the honest and sincere friends of the union and all those who were, or hoped to be, beneficiaries of Federal legislation. Naturally, a champion of the union was sought for; and he was found in Daniel Webster, whose reply to Hayne added very much to his fame, was regarded as a coup de grace to States' rights, and became as familiar as Mother Goose's Melodies in every section of the union. Mr. Webster delivered two speeches in the course of the debate, one on January 25th, and the other two days after, as a rejoinder. Mr. Grady considers the two together and summarizes them as follows: First—He (Webster) asserts that the power of Congress is unlimited in granting public lands for roads, canals, education, etc., in Ohio and other western States, without regard to the conditions on which Virginia and other States ceded the lan