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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Lucretia Mott or search for Lucretia Mott in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
e those who had long been actively interested in the antislavery cause, and who, as personal friends of Lundy and subscribers to the Genius, were not unfamiliar with Garrison. Among them were Thomas Shipley, Dr. Edwin P. Atlee, and James and Lucretia Mott, all of whom proffered the hospitality of their homes and gave him words of encouragement. Of the Motts he afterwards wrote: Though I was strongly sectarian in my religious sentiments (Calvinistic) at that time, and hence uncharitable in jand I think it has burst every sectarian trammel.)—if theological dogmas which I once regared as essential to Christianity, I now repudiate as absurd and pernicious,—I am largely indebted to them for the change (Lib. 19.178; Life of James and Lucretia Mott, pp. 296, 297). In New York he repeated his lectures in Broadway Hall to small but respectable audiences, Arthur and Lewis Tappan honoring him with their presence. Thence he went to New Haven, and was welcomed by his friend Simeon S. Joc
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
rt Purvis, and James Miller McKim. On the second day, too, a handful of women, all members of the Society of Friends—Lucretia Mott, Esther Moore, Lydia White, and Sidney Ann Lewis—were, on Thomas Whitson's invitation, in attendance, and, both by the Mosaic law to be stoned to death, is also, to the eye of a rational observer, a very curious show (Lib. 10.56). Lucretia Mott—like the clever school-teacher she had been—suggested one or two rhetorical amendments which were obvious improvementclaration not one was a woman. Such was the custom of the times, in regard to the public relation of the sexes, that Lucretia Mott and her Quaker sisters did not ask or expect to sign; the male delegates—even the members of their own sect—did not to that we were very glad to get one of our own class [laughter] to come and aid us in forming that Society (Speech of Lucretia Mott, Third Decade Proceedings, p. 43). Take also the subscribed declaration of 124 clergymen of all denominations ag
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
National Society; but how can I give up my paper? At the same date Arnold Buffum wrote, kindly inviting Ms. April 12, 1834, to W. L. G. him to make his house his home during the proposed visit to Philadelphia, sympathizing with him for being cramped for money, and relating his endeavors to push collections; but admitting that this is indeed a dull place for abolition principles, and that he could not see that any (male) anti-slavery society would be started there. May 8, 1834, Lucretia Mott writes to J. McKim: Last week we had the renewed pleasure of a visit from Wm. L. Garrison. He passed several days in the city, addressed the colored people at the Wesleyan and Bethel churches, and would have delivered a public address had he met with more encouragement from our timid Philadelphia friends. He was even discouraged in the desire he felt to say a few words to our young men on the evening of their founding themselves into a society. He was present, but, at the request of o