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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 3 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Louise Chandler Moulton or search for Louise Chandler Moulton in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: seventy years young 1889-1890; aet. 70-71 (search)
nd make myself as long as I can, so that the robbers will think I am a grown — up person, and perhaps then they will not touch me! Then, she told us, I would stretch myself out at full length, and go to sleep. She was reading Martineau's Study of religion this summer with close attention and deep interest. His writings gave her unfailing delight. His portrait hung in her room; on her desk lay always a slender volume of his Prayers, her favorite passages marked in pencil. When Louise Chandler Moulton lay dying, the best comfort she could devise for her was the loan of this precious little volume. The Study of religion is not light reading. We find now and then: Head threatening. Will not tackle Martineau to-day ; and again: My head is possessed with my study of Martineau. Had a moment's realizing sense this morning of the universe as created and constantly re-created by the thought of the will of God. The phrase is common enough: the thought, vast beyond human conception.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
of Schiller's Robbers, which I bought for threepence. July 7. Afternoon tea with Mrs. Oscar, meeting an aunt of Mrs. Wilde's, and Mrs. Burne-Jones. The aunt had been in Japan — she had known Fenollosa and Professor Morse. Then to Mrs. Louise Chandler Moulton, who introduced a number of people, among them William Sharp, a poet. July 8. I had rashly promised to lunch with the Brooke Herfords at Hampstead, and to take fiveo'clock tea with Mrs. Rebecca Moore at Bedford Place. The Herfords wll well. We talked of the old London, the old Boston, both past their palmiest literary days. She had heard Phillips Brooks at Westminster Abbey; admired him much, but thought him optimistic. July 14. Was engaged to spend the afternoon at Mrs. Moulton's reception and to dine with Sebastian Schlesinger.... Many people introduced to me-Jerome, author of Three Men in a Boat ; Molloy, songwriter; Theodore Watts, poetical critic of the Athenaeum. ... At the dinner I met Mrs. O'Connor, who turned
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
etc.], and the first bird that I shall introduce will be Rev. E. E. Hale. beginning thus, I introduced T. W. Higginson as the great American Eagle; Judge [Robert] Grant as a mocking-bird; C. F. Adams as the trained German canary who sings all the songs of Yawcob Strauss; C. G. Ames said, you must n't call me an owl. I brought him forward and said, my dear minister says that I must not call him an owl, and I will not; only the owl is the bird of wisdom and he is very wise. I introduced Mrs. Moulton as a nightingale. For Trowbridge I could think of nothing and said, this bird will speak for himself. introduced N. H. Dole as a bird rarely seen, the phoenix. at the close E. E. H. Said, you have an admirable power of introducing. this little device pleased me foolishly. February 4. wrote a careful letter to W. F. Savage. He had written, asking an explanation of some old manuscript copy of my Battle Hymn and of the theft perpetrated of three of its verses in pen pictures of the W
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
he universe by force of epigrams in verse, He'd smash some idols, I allow, but who would alter Mrs. Howe? Robert Grant. Dot oldt Fader time must be cutting some dricks, Vhen he calls our goot Bresident's age eighty-six. an octogeranium! who would suppose? my dear Mrs. Julia Ward Howe der time goes! Yawcob Strauss (Charles Follen Adams). you, who are of the spring, to whom youth's joys must cling. May all that love can give beguile you long to live-- our Queen of hearts. Louise Chandler Moulton. Mrs. Howe's reply why, bless you, I ain't nothing, nor nobody, nor much, if you look in your Directory, you'll find a thousand such; I walk upon the level ground, I breathe upon the air, I study at a table, and reflect upon a chair. I know a casual mixture of the Latin and the Greek, I know the Frenchman's parlez-vous, and how the Germans speak; well can I add, and well subtract, and say twice two is four, but of those direful sums and proofs remember nothing more. I wrote a
tagu, Basil, I, 81, 85. Montagu, Mrs., Basil, I, 85. Montgomery, Richard, I, 6. Montpelier, II, 68. Montreal, I, 38. Montreux, II, 176. Moore, Prof., II, 154. Moore, Rebecca, II, 170. Moore, Thomas, I, 87. Mormon Tabernacle, II, 137. Morpeth, see Carlisle, Earl of. Morris, Gouverneur, I, 7, 8. Morse, E. S., II, 169. Morse, William, II, 108. Mosby, John, II, 253. Mothers' Peace Day, I, 318, 319, 345. Mott, Lucretia, I, 285, 304; I, 108. Moulton, Louise C., II, 161, 169, 171, 273. Verse by, 335. Mounet-Sully, Jean, II, 195. Mt. Auburn, I, 183; II, 290, 294. Mt. Holyoke, I, 251. Mozart, W. A., I, 45; II, 351. Mozier, Joseph, I, 271. Mozumdar, II, 87. Munich, I, 278. Murray, Gilbert, II, 361. Murray, Lady, Mary, II, 361. Music, power of, I, 44. Musical Festivals, Boston, I, 222, 223, 225, 227, 290. Mycenae, II, 5, 43. Nantes, revocation of Edict of, I, 10. Naples, I, 53, 54, 97; II, 30. Napoleon