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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 4 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Mouton or search for Mouton in all documents.

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ey will acknowledge the principle which we contend for. Gentlemen, in such a situation of things In the Convention of our great party, it is right that we should part. Go your way, and we will go ours. The South leaves you — not like Hagar, driven into the wilderness, friendless and alone — but I tell Southern men here, and, for them, I tell the North, that, in less than sixty days, you will find a united South standing side by side with us. (Prolonged and enthusiastic cheering.) Mr. Mouton, of Louisiana, briefly announced that all the delegates from his State but two would withdraw from the Convention, and protested against the right of the two to act or cast any vote in behalf of the State. Hon. James Simons, of South Carolina, announced the withdrawal of the delegation from that State, in a communication signed by all the thirteen members thereof; in the words following: We, the undersigned delegates appointed by the Democratic State Convention of South Carolina, be
Federal property, 412. Moore, Gov. Thos. O., of La., calls a Secession Convention, 348. Moore, Col., (Rebel,) killed at Bull Run, 545. Morehead, Charles S., 509; 614. more, Hannah, her opinion of Oglethorpe, 32. Morgan, Capt. John, 597 ; 614. Morris, Gouverneur, 43 to 45. Morris, Isaac N., of 11., 375. Morrison, Capt. J. J., surrenders the cutter Cass to the Rebels, 413. Morse, Prof. Samuel F. B., 439. Mount Oread, Kansas, seized by the Border Ruffians, 243. Mouton, Mr., of La., withdraws from the Democratic Convention, 314. Mullins, Mr., of S. C., Secession speech of, 335. Mulligan, Col., is besieged in Lexington, 586; his report of the siege, 583-9. N. Napoleon, Ark., seizure of the Arsenal at, 488. Napoleon Bonaparte, acquires Louisiana of Spain, 54; sells it to the United States, 56; his rapacity compared with the Ostend Manifesto. 275. Nashville Banner, The, citation from, 349. Nashville Gazette, The, extract from, 484. Nash