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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 150 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 25 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 14 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Alfred Mouton or search for Alfred Mouton in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

ight, colonel; Jas. E. Harrison, lieutenant-colonel; J. W. Daniels, major. Hawpe's regiment, T. C. Hawpe, colonel; G. W. Guess, lieutenant-colonel; J. T. Malone, major. Alexander's regiment, A. M. Alexander, colonel; J. H. Candle, lieutenant-colonel; J. R. Russell, major. Stevens' regiment, Jas. G. Stevens, colonel; Wm. H. Johnson, lieutenant-colonel; John A. Buck, major. Part of this brigade was in the battles of southern Louisiana, and was afterward under command of General Polignac in Mouton's division. Other commands went to the Indian nation and to southern Arkansas under S. B. Maxey, R. M. Gano, Peter Hardeman, N. W. Battle, T. C. Ross, Jas. Duff, Charles De Morse, D. Showalter and Jas. Bourland. Colonel Maxey having been appointed major-general, in command of some of these forces, fought a successful battle at a place called Poison Spring, capturing a large wagon train and many prisoners. While so many commands were going northward from Texas to find active service in
Trans-Mississippi department. The services of the Texas troops in Louisiana and Arkansas in the years 1863 and 1864 were as follows: Early in the spring of 1863 Sibley's brigade was ordered to Louisiana, and with Louisiana troops under General Mouton took part in the battle of Camp Bisland on Bayou Teche in Southern Louisiana, April 13th,Brigadier-General Sibley commanding all the forces in the battle. Col. James Reily was killed at the head of his regiment, and General Sibley left the 0,000 troops and commenced a march up Red river. From what was afterward known, this course was adopted to reach the heart of Texas. It was reported, as one evidence of it, that the wagon train had in it scythes to reap the wheat. Walker's and Mouton's divisions and Tom Green's two brigades of cavalry impeded the Federal march up the river step by step until the 8th of April, 1864, giving time for a large number of Texas troops, and Missouri and Arkansas troops under General Price, to come in
eral Taylor and were highly commended by him. Gen. Alfred Mouton, in his report of these operations, said: I wajor, surrendered, according to the report of Gen. Alfred Mouton, to a scouting party under the command of Gencavalry, under Brigadier-General Bee, on its right; Mouton's division on the left of the road, with Major's ding of his own and Bagby's brigades (dismounted), on Mouton's left. Debray's regiment of cavalry was held in t with Walker's division, Cornay's and Nettles' with Mouton's division. McMahan's battery, which had been in from the right to the left of the road to strengthen Mouton's, causing the whole line to gain ground to the lef that his arrangements were not complete, 1 ordered Mouton to open the attack from the left. [In the charge wegiment drawn from the right, dismounted his men on Mouton's left and kept pace with his advance, forcing back and turning the enemy's right. Randal supported Mouton's attack by advancing his regiment en echelon from th