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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
opped their anchors, except the Metacomet, Port Royal, Kennebec, and Itasca. After the forts were passed, the three last named had cut loose from their escorts and gone to aid the Metacomet in her struggle with the Selma and Morgan. The Oneida, the last ship in the line, suffered more severely than any other of the fleet in the passage. One shell exploded in the boiler, another cut the wheel-ropes, and a third disabled the forward pivot-gun. The list of casualties was very large, Commander Mullany being among the wounded. The crippled vessel was carried on by her consort, the Galena.--editors. The thunder of heavy artillery now ceased. The crews of the various vessels had begun to efface the marks of the terrible contest by washing the decks and clearing up the splinters. The cooks were preparing break-fast, the surgeons were busily engaged in making amputations and binding arteries, and under canvas, on the port side of each vessel, lay the ghastly line of dead waiting t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Mobile. (search)
pounder rifles, 20 9-inch, 1 howitzer; Richmond, Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins, 1 100-pounder rifle, 1 30-pounder rifle, 18 9-inch, 2 howitzers; Lackawanna, Capt. J. B. Marchand, 1150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren pivot, 2 11-inch, 4 9-inch, 6 howitzers; Monongahela, Com. James H. Strong, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 2 11-inch, 5 32-pounders, 3 howitzers; Ossipee, Com. William E. Le Roy, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 11-inch, 6 32-pounders, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 howitzers; Oneida, Com. J. R. M. Mullany, 2 11-inch, pivot, 3 30-pounder Parrotts, 4 32-pounders, 1 howitzer; Seminole, Com. Edward Donaldson, 1 11-inch pivot, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 6 32-pounders, Screw-steamer. Galena, Lieut.-Com. Clark H. Wells, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 30-pounder, 8 9-inch, 1 howitzer. Double-Enders. Octorara, Lieut.-Com. Charles H. Greene, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 3 9-inch, 2 32-pounders, 4 howitzers; Metacomet, Lieut.-Com. James E. Jouett, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 4 9-inch, 4 howit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The ram Tennessee at Mobile Bay. (search)
nd his aides. Five days after the admiral's departure I was transported to Pensacola and transferred to the receiving-ship Potomac, lying off the navy yard; but as soon as Admiral Farragut's fleet-surgeon, Dr. James C. Palmer, heard of my arrival he had me removed to the hospital, owing to the fact of my suffering at the time with a painful disease. On reaching the hospital I found myself placed in a room near to that occupied by Admiral Buchanan, and immediately adjoining that of Captain J. R. M. Mullany, who had commanded the steamer Oneida of the fleet, and had had the misfortune to have his left arm shot away during the action. I had known him long before the war, and called upon him at once to offer my condolence. After remaining in the hospital about three weeks I was placed on board a small ordnance steamer in company with Lieutenant-Commanding Murphy, late of the Selma, with Lieutenants Bradford and Wharton of the Tennessee, accompanied by my servant (whom Admiral Farragu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
her. On the 3d of June Lieutenant-Commander W. E. Fitzhugh received the surrender of Lieutenant J. H. Carter and the Confederate naval forces under his command in the Red River. On the west Gulf coast the blockade continued until the end, several important cutting-out expeditions occurring during January and February. Among these the most noteworthy were the capture of the Delphina, January 22d, in Calcasieu River, by Lieutenant-Commander R. W. Meade; of the Pet and the Anna Sophia, February 7th, at Galveston, by an expedition organized by Commander J. R. M. Mullany; and of the Anna Dale, February 18th, at Pass Cavallo, by a party sent in by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Erben. After the surrender of Mobile, Admiral Thatcher turned his attention to the coast of Texas, and on May 25th Sabine Pass was evacuated. On the 2d of June Galveston surrendered, and the war on the Texas coast came to an end. The Levee at Nashville, looking down the Cumberland. From a War-time photograph.