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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Ellis Munford or search for Ellis Munford in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
is works that he put into the battle every man he had. General Jackson waited at White Oak Swamp during the battle of Frayser's Farm because he was directed to stay on this road until further orders. As a soldier he could do nothing else. He gave the same unquestioned obedience to the officer above him, that he demanded of those under his control. Moreover the stream was impassible for infantry under fire, and impassible for artillery without a bridge. Jackson and his staff, with Colonel Munford's cavalry, tested it, riding across through quagmires that took us up to the girths of our horses; but by a fierce artillery attack he kept Franklin's and part of Sumner's corps from joining with McCall to resist the attack at Frayser's Farm. This attack General Jackson began with twenty-eight pieces of artillery at twelve o'clock that day. The battle at Frayser's Farm began at five o'clock the same afternoon. White Oak Swamp road is but five miles distant. If General Lee had wanted J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
ttle (Malvern Hill) was raging: I am proud of Richmond. I am proud of my fellow-citizens. I could never have believed it possible for human beings to behave so admirably as they have done to-day. From my soul I am proud of them. In the issue of this paper of the 3d of of July, we find the following notices: Major John Stewart Walker, former captain of the Virginia Life Guards, was killed on Tuesday. He was a gallant officer, and one of our best and most influential citizens. Ellis Munford, son of the Secretary of the Commonwealth, also fell mortally wounded. There also, you will find a long list of the killed and wounded, and notices of the work in the hospitals, and tributes to the noble women in this city, ministering angels of charity then as now. The sons they had sent forth with the Roman matron's injunction were returning upon their shields. In habiliaments of mourning they visited the hospitals, ministering to the Southern youths who, far from home and frien