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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 61 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for T. T. Munford or search for T. T. Munford in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
an. Second Maryland Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert. Unattached. Fifth Alabama Battalion. Cavalry corps. on face of return appears to have consisted of Hampton's, Fitz. Lee's and W. H. F. Lee's divisions and Dearing's brigade. Major-General Wade Hampton, Commanding. Lee's division. reported as detached. Major-General Fitzhugh Lee. Wickham's brigade. Brigadier-General W. C. Wickham. First Virginia, Colonel R. W. Carter. Second Virginia, Colonel T. T. Munford, Third Virginia, Colonel T. H. Owen. Fourth Virginia, Colonel W. H. Payne. Lomax's brigade. Brigadier General L. L. Lomax. Fifth Virginia, Colonel H. Clay Pate. Sixth Virginia, Colonel Julian Harrison. Fifteenth Virginia, Colonel C. R. Collins. Butler's division. Major-General M. C. Butler. Dunovants brigade. Brigadier-General John Dunovant. Third South Carolina, [Colonel C. J. Colcock.] Fourth South Carolina, [Colonel B. H. Rutledge.] Fifth [Sixth] South Ca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
Reminiscences of cavalry operations. By General T. T. Munford. Paper no. I. Rev. J. Wm . Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society Recent communications have appeared in the Philadelphia Weekly Times, written by officers who served in the Confederate cavalry. The reminiscences which these have revived, together with frequent solicitations from officers and soldiers of the brigade I had the honor to command so long and often, as senior Colonel and Brigadier General, have inducedf the Opequon creek, and found their cavalry; and yet he could not get at ours; and it was in poor condition. 'Tis wondrous strange, the like never yet heard of. Early had held Winchester for more than a month without fortifications, which he would not attempt with his great army to hold at all—and wanted him to detach. All advantages are fair in war! Think what would have been the result had Early had Sheridan's command and Sheridan Early's, where would Early have stopped? T. T. Munford
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
them to within a half-mile of Dinwiddie C. H. Munford, in command of my old division, held our line. H. F. Lee was on his right, one regiment of Munford's command on his left, uniting with the pickeround and menacing our left flank. I ordered Munford to go in person, ascertain the exact conditio after dark, and was principally sustained by Munford's command, of my old division, with a steadinommand of his own, and my old division, under Munford, proceeded to Rice's Station, on the Southsidest the infantry, Rosser's in the centre, and Munford's on the extreme right, making a mounted forcLee retiring towards our rear, and Rosser and Munford out towards Lynchburg, having cleared that robehavior of Generals W. H. F. Lee, Rosser and Munford, commanding divisions. The former was detachtaining the liberty of his country. Brigadier-General Munford, commanding my division, mentions mo Virginia, and Irving, First Virginia, all of Munford's old brigade; Captain Henry Lee, A. A. G.; L[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Florida boy's experience in prison and in escaping. (search)
trial. His arrest was a pure accident. On the 29th of September, having to attend an organization at Evansville, Indiana, he left Marshal, accompanied by Lieutenant Munford, an officer of a Tennessee regiment, and myself. At Sullivan, a little town on the Wabash, we saw a great many excited people. They eyed us suspiciously, d us quartered under a strong guard at Indianapolis. Before we left Sullivan, and once afterwards, Castleman could easily have escaped, but not being able to get Munford and myself off with him, chose to stay and share our confinement. In the course of the next three weeks the authorities discovered who Castleman was, and ferreted out some of his projects. He and Munford were accordingly kept in close confinement, and I being merely an escaped prisoner and not of any importance, was placed with the common herd in Camp Morton. The general plan of camp Morton was the same as that of Rock Island. It was not near so neat however, nor were the accommodatio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
Reminiscences of cavalry operations. Paper no. 2. By Gen. T. T. Munford. Battle of Winchester, 19th September, 1864. My brigade was moved hurriedly from the right over to the left with Bretherd's old battery, and taken by General Fitz Lee across the Red Bud Creek to relieve the heavy pressure upon a part of General Bradley Johnson's cavalry, then skirmishing with the enemy. Johnson's troops were on the left of Evans' infantry brigade of Gordon's division. We were dismounted, and became engaged very quickly; but a few well-directed shots from our horse artillery cleared our immediate front—General Fitz. Lee taking command of the whole line, Wickham of the division, I had the brigade. Our battery was moved up to the edge of a piece of timber; to our front and right was an open plateau extending for several miles. Our battery was sheltered by timber on our left. The enemy's batteries were firing obliquely to our right at our infantry and their batteries (Carter's and Br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
Lee, Hampton, and Robertson, the latter under Munford, the whole probably, for there are no reportsore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was posted on the right with his advance at efend the passes in the Catoctin, and ordered Munford to hold the gap at Jefferson for that purposeHampton, on arriving at Burkettsville, joined Munford with his two fragments of regiments. At ni and the reports as Turner's Gap, Hampton and Munford guarded Crampton's Gap. Reno's corps, of B the South Mountain and the Potomac, and left Munford with his handful of cavalry to guard Cramptonhone's brigade. About noon Franklin arrived, Munford dismounted his cavalry and deployed them behiumbering 300 men and were similarly posted by Munford. Franklin promptly formed Slocum's divisiodivision on the left and moved them forward. Munford clung to his position with tenacity, and it Potomac was held by Stuart, with Fitz Lee and Munford and the Horse Artillery. During the 16th Mc-[3 more...]