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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 45 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 8 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 4 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Thomas T. Munford or search for Thomas T. Munford in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
gade. General Payne was wounded at Amelia Springs and was succeeded by Gen. Thos. T. Munford. Under him, the Marylanders, like the McDonalds, always nearest the enOn the 9th of April a heavy force of the Federal cavalry was seen moving along Munford's front, parallel to it. Dorsey mounted his men and, pulling down a fence in hny E, was killed. His was the last blood shed in the war in Virginia. As General Munford well said in his farewell address to the Marylanders, You spilled the first blood of the war in Baltimore and you shed the last in Virginia. Munford did not surrender at Appomattox. None of the cavalry did. They marched away to Lynchbuved at Cloverdale in Botetourt county, they received this parting address from Munford, the bravest of the brave. Cloverdale, Botetourt Co., Va., April 28, 18 wishes for your welfare, and a hearty God bless you, I bid you farewell. Thomas T. Munford, Brigadier-General Commanding Division. And so closes the record of t