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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 45 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 8 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 4 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas T. Munford or search for Thomas T. Munford in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
Confederate officer in his possession, or on parole, he would be exchanged for his equivalent. But that beyond that, he would not, and could not, parole commissioned officers then in his possession, but would continue to parole non-commissioned officers and privates. He said: This course has been forced on the Confederate Government, not only by the refusal of the authorities of the United States to respond to the repeated applications of this Government in relation to the execution of Munford, but by their persistence in retaining Confederate officers who were entitled to parole and exchange. He said: You have now, of captures that are by no means recent, many officers of the Confederate service, who are retained in your military prisons East and West. Applications have been made for the release of same without success, and others have been kept in confinement so long as to justify the conclusion that you refuse both to parole and exchange. Id., pp. 186-7. Judge Ould
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fatal wounding of General J. E. B Stuart. (search)
istorical writers. Though Gus Dorsey, like his comrade, the famous Jim Breathed, is little known to the Confederate societies of Maryland, both are most favorably known to that ideal soldier and gentleman, without an if or a but—Brigadier-General Thomas T. Munford—as they were to Colonel William A. Morgan and other gallant Virginians, who, like themselves, were at the front to the end. In Mohun, by Lieutenant-Colonel J. Esten Cooke, there is a picture of Captain Dorsey catching General Stuaraptures of a mythical battery, as in the Sun's last article. From the report of Brigadier-General George A. Custer, General Jeb Stuart is supposed to have received his death wound from Private John H. Huff, a sharpshooter, Company E, Fifth Michigan Cavalry, Custer's Brigade, who died from a wound received at Haw's Shop on May 28, 1864. Gus W. Dorsey was Lieutenant-Colonel commanding the First Maryland Cavalry, Munford's Brigade, April 28, 1865. Frank Dorsey. Baltimore, December 20, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
en into the hands of the enemy; but time will not permit so pleasant a digression. It is enough to say that it was one of the most brilliant and successful engagements in which our troops were involved during the war, and one which shed well-deserved renown not only on General Wade Hampton, who commanded, but on every officer and man under him. Conspicuous for their gallantry and valuable service in that battle was the Second Virginia Cavalry, under our distinguished fellow-citizen, General T. T. Munford. This great regiment was made up of companies from Lynchburg and the surrounding counties, and was, therefore, one of whose record we all have a right to be proud. On the day of that fight it was especially distinguished for its daring courage and for its achievements. It was in the front of the charging column which broke Custer's line and captured four out of the five caissons lost by Sheridan on that day. It captured Custer's headquarters, his sash and private wagon and papers.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
, Edwin D. Yancey, W. T. Second Regiment Virginia Cavalry. First mounted regiment organized in Virginia. Organized at Lynchburg, May 8, 1861, Colonel J. A. Early, mustering officer. First Colonel, R. C. W. Radford. Second Colonel, T. T. Munford. Third Colonel, Cary Breckinridge. First Lieutenant-Colonel, T. T. Munford. Second Lieutenant-Colonel, J. W. Watts. Third Lieutenant-Colonel, Cary Breckinridge. Fourth Lieutenant-Colonel, W. F. Graves. First Major, J. S. LanghorFirst Lieutenant-Colonel, T. T. Munford. Second Lieutenant-Colonel, J. W. Watts. Third Lieutenant-Colonel, Cary Breckinridge. Fourth Lieutenant-Colonel, W. F. Graves. First Major, J. S. Langhorne. Second Major, A. L. Pitzer. Third Major, Cary Breckinridge. Fourth Major, W. F. Graves. Fifth Major, Thomas Whitehead. First Adjutant, R. H. Banks. Second Adjutant, Lomax Tayloe. Third Adjutant, John W. Tayloe. Fourth Adjutant, Samuel Griffin. First Assistant Surgeon, S. H. Meredith. Second Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Bowyer. Third Assistant Surgeon, W. B. Davies. Fourth Assistant Surgeon, J. H. Nelson. Fifth Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Peake. Sixth Assi