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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 10 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
th which to follow; but the conductor of the train, W. A. Fuller, and Plan of the blockade at Kingston Station. Anthony Murphy, foreman of the Atlanta railway machine shops, who happened to be on board of Fuller's train, started on foot after ulittle inclined to afford — would indeed have almost certainly given us the victory. So, abandoning his engine, he, with Murphy, ran across to the Rome train, and, uncoupling the engine and one car, pushed forward with about forty armed men. As the rder to let us out. Here, again, our position was most critical, for the pursuers were rapidly approaching. Fuller and Murphy saw the obstruction of the broken rail, in time to prevent wreck, by reversing their engine; but the hindrance was for th some way so that we might be able to burn the Chickamauga bridges, still ahead. The chances seemed good that Fuller and Murphy would be wrecked. We broke out the end of our last box car and dropped cross-ties on the track as we ran, thus checking
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
te and reasonable conclusion, and but for the energy and quick judgment of Mr. Fuller, the conductor, and Mr. Cain, the engineer of the stolen train, and of Mr. Anthony Murphy, foreman of the Wood Department of the State road, who accidentally happened on the train that morning, the plans of Mr. Andrews and his party would have reeing three men starting on foot after a train which had just whirled away from before their eyes, under the highest power of steam. But Messrs. Fuller, Cain, and Murphy, nowise daunted by the disparity of motive power, put on all their speed and ran along the track for three miles, until they came up with some track raisers who hrain at a standstill, in consequence of the destruction of a portion of the road by the Yankee runaways. This was vexatious, but it did not discourage Fuller and Murphy, who left the engine and once more put out on foot, alone. After two miles running, they met the down freight train from Adamsville-reversed and ran it backward
te and reasonable conclusion, and but for the energy and quick judgment of Mr. Fuller, the conductor, and Mr. Cain, the engineer of the stolen train, and of Mr. Anthony Murphy, foreman of the Wood Department of the State road, who accidentally happened on the train that morning, the plans of Mr. Andrews and his party would have reeing three men starting on foot after a train which had just whirled away from before their eyes, under the highest power of steam. But Messrs. Fuller, Cain, and Murphy, nowise daunted by the disparity of motive power, put on all their speed and ran along the track for three miles, until they came up with some track raisers who hrain at a standstill, in consequence of the destruction of a portion of the road by the Yankee runaways. This was vexatious, but it did not discourage Fuller and Murphy, who left the engine and once more put out on foot, alone. After two miles running, they met the down freight train from Adamsville-reversed and ran it backward
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
gers, they boarded the northward bound mail train. At Big Shanty, now known as Kenesaw, while the train stopped for breakfast, Andrews and his men hurried forward and uncoupled a section of the train, consisting of three empty box cars connected with the engine, which they at once managed by two experienced men detailed for that purpose. The engine pulled off rapidly and was gone before the sentinels standing near suspected the movement. William A. Fuller, conductor of the train, and Anthony Murphy, foreman of the Atlanta machine shops, who happened to be on the train, at once comprehended that the section had been stolen, and starting on foot, ran until they found a handcar, with which they pushed forward more rapidly. After a chase of many vicissitudes, the pursuing Confederates secured an engine, with which they pressed Andrews so closely that he ordered his party to abandon the road and take to the woods, but all of them were captured in a few days. Andrews and seven men who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
l. from Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, December 29, 1909. Anthony Murphy, had part in wild race during Civil war. His exploit one olict between States. Atlanta, Ga., December 28, 1909. Anthony Murphy, aged eighty years, a pioneer citizen of the South and one of t Ga., by Federal raiders during the Civil War, died here to-day. Murphy was born in Ireland, and came to this country when twenty-six yearses anxious to join the Confederate army, aroused the suspicion of Mr. Murphy, who was then foreman of the Western and Atlantic round-house at Big Shanty. When the General started on its wild race, Murphy and two others started on foot in pursuit, seized a handcar later, ran it to Eype, most of the race was made at the rate of sixty miles an hour. Murphy was the engineer, and Jeff Cain the train engineer and Captain Fuller, the conductor, fired for him. The war left Murphy penniless, but he set to work again cheerfully, and when he died had amassed a fortun