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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
(admitted 1863) Provisional Governor Francis H. Peirpoint (1861-3) Governor Arthur I. Boreman (1863-9) Wisconsin Governor Alexander W. Randall (1857-61) Governor Louis P. Harvey (1861-2) Governor Edward Salomon (1862-3) Governor James T. Lewis (1863-6). Confederate States Alabama Governor Andrew B. Moore (1857-61) Governor John Gill Shorter (1861-3) Governor Thomas H. Watts (1863-5) Arkansas Governor Henry M. Rector (1860-3) Governor Harris Flanagin (1863-4) Governor Isaac Murphy (1864-8) Florida Governor Madison S. Perry (1857-61) Governor John Milton (1861-5) Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown (1857-65) Louisiana Governor Thomas O. Moore (1860-4) Governor Henry W. Allen (1864-5) Union military governors Governor George F. Shepley (1862-4) Governor Michael Hahn (1864-5) Mississippi Governor John J. Pettus (1860-2) Governor Charles Clarke (1863) Governor Jacob Thompson (1863-4) North Carolina G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
can't spare a gun to turn on them, was the reply. There was no supporting infantry on his left. Said Rock, I'll charge them! This meant to attack a full regiment of infantry advancing in line, 700 or 800 strong, with 22 men. Galloping back a few paces to his little band, his clear, ringing voice could be heard by friend and enemy. Battalion, forward, trot, march, gallop, march, charge! and with a wild yell in they went, their gallant chief in the lead, closely followed by Sabre Jack Murphy, an old regular dragoon; Fitzsimmons, Coggins, O'Flaherty, Pomeroy, and the others. The last named were old British dragoons; three of them had ridden with the heavy squadrons at Balaklava and all well knew what was in front of them. . . . Within thirty seconds they were right in the midst of the surprised Federal infantry, shouting, slashing, shooting. Corporal Casey charged on foot. Guibor's two guns were at the same time turned left oblique and deluged the Federal left with canister.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
on the Ordinance was taken, and a majority appeared against it. The conspirators were determined not to be foiled. The President, who seems to have been a plastic instrument in their hands, immediately arose, and in the midst of the cheers of the people, vehemently urged the Unionists to change their votes to ay immediately. It was evident that a large number of that crowd were prepared to compel them to do so, and the terrified Unionists complied, with only one exception, and that was Isaac Murphy, who was compelled to fly for his life. He was rewarded for his fidelity by the Unionists, who elected him Governor of the State in 1864. Thus, by fraud and violence, Arkansas was placed in the position of a rebellious State. The Convention then authorized the Governor to call out sixty thousand men, if necessary, for military duty. The State was divided into two military divisions, eastern and western. General Bradley was appointed to the command of the Eastern Division, and Gener
its recovery, had been accepted by the Unionists of Arkansas as conclusive of the inability of the foe to regain their lost ascendency in their State. Accordingly, a Union meeting of citizens was held at Little Rock, Nov. 12, 1863. followed by others; and, ultimately, a Union State Constitutional Convention had been assembled: Jan. 8, 1864. wherein 42 out of the 54 counties were represented. This Convention had framed a new Constitution, whereby Slavery was forever prohibited. Dr. Isaac Murphy--the only member of the Convention of 1861 who had held out to the last against Secession — had been designated Provisional. Governor, and duly inaugurated, Jan. 22. with C. C. Bliss, Lieut.-Governor, and R. J. T. White, Secretary of State. This Constitution was submitted to a vote of the people and ratified March 14. by 12,177 votes for, to 226 against it. State officers, three members of Congress, a Legislature, and local officers, were at the same time elected. The Legislatu
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 135.-Governor Murphy's address. (search)
Doc. 135.-Governor Murphy's address. To the People of the Counties of Arkansas for which no Elections have been held: Citizens of Arkansas: I address you because you have been so far deprived of the privilege of aiding in the restoration of civil government in the State, by the occupation of your section of the State by the rebel army. In January last, a Convention of Delegates, elected by a portion of the people, met at Little Rock, remodelled the Constitution of the State, and appods the admiration and respect of the world; and whose Government has never failed to avenge or right the wrongs done to its humblest citizen. Spurn, then, the tyranny and oppression of the leaders of this wicked rebellion, and return to the home of your ancestors, and your own by inheritance, and atone for the past by securing to your posterity freedom, security, and happiness hereafter. Isaac Murphy, Provisional Governor of Arkansas. Executive office, little Rock, Arkansas, March 23, 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
illness, and one Union man after another prefaced his vote by some stirring sentiment in favor of the South. When the result was announced--69 for the ordinance, to 1 against it — there was tremendous cheering. The negative vote was given by Isaac Murphy, who was the Union governor of Arkansas in 1864. Meanwhile the State authorities had seized the national property in the State. During almost the whole period of the war, National or Confederate troops occupied the State; and one of the mote Governors of Arkansas. James S. Conway1836 to 1840 Archibald Yell1840 to 1844 Samuel Adams1844 Thomas S. Drew1844 to 1848 John S. Roane1848 to 1852 Elias N. Conway1852 to 1860 Henry M. Rector1860 to 1862 Harris Flanagin1862 to 1864 Isaac Murphy1864 to 1868 Powell Clayton1868 to 1871 Orzo H. Hadley1871 to 1872 Elisha Baxter1872 to 1874 Augustus H. Garland1874 to 1876 Wm. R. Miller1877 to 1881 Thos. J. Churchill1881 to 1883 Jas. H. Berry1883 to 1885 Simon P. Hughes1885 to 1889
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cow Chace, the (search)
yal heroes stand; Virtue had nerved each honest breast, And Industry each hand.In See Lee's trial. valor's frenzy, Hamilton Rode like a soldier big, And secretary Harrison, With pen stuck in his wig.But, lest chieftain Washington Should mourn them in the mumps, A disorder prevalent in the rebel lines. The fate of Withrington to shun, They fought behind the stumps.But ah! Thaddeus Posset, why Should thy poor soul elope? And why should Titus Hooper die, Ah! die—without a rope?Apostate Murphy, thou to whom Fair Shela ne'er was cruel; In death shalt hear her mourn thy doom, Och! would ye die, my jewel?Thee, Nathan Pumpkin, I lament, Of melancholy fate, The gray goose, stolen as he went, In his heart's blood was wet.Now as the fight was further fought And balls began to thicken, The fray assumed, the gen'rals thought, The color of a licking.Yet undismayed the chiefs command, And, to redeem the day, Cry, “Soldiers, charge!” they hear, they stand, They turn and run away. Canto II<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ning in northeastern Tennessee during the winter; in the spring he joins General Lee at Richmond......Dec. 1-4, 1863 General Sherman's command and the 4th Corps, Army of the Cumberland, reinforce Knoxville from Chattanooga......Dec. 3-6, 1863 Thirty-eighth Congress, first session, convenes......Dec. 7, 1863 President Lincoln proclaims amnesty to all Confederates on returning to their allegiance......Dec. 8, 1863 Total debt of Confederacy, $1,220,866,042.50......Jan. 1, 1864 Isaac Murphy inaugurated provisional governor of Arkansas......Jan. 22, 1864 President calls for 500,000 men for three years......Feb. 1, 1864 Sherman's Meridian expedition leaves Vicksburg, Miss......Feb. 3, 1864 More than 100 Union prisoners, including Col. Thomas E. Rose and Colonel Streight, escape from Libby prison, Richmond, Va., by tunnelling under the walls......Feb. 9, 1864 First Federal prisoners received at Andersonville prison, Ga......Feb. 15, 1864 Second Confederate Congre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas (search)
d against secession (vote, 39 to 35)......March 16, 1861 Arsenals seized at Napoleon and Fort Smith......April 23-24, 1861 Act of secession adopted by the legislature—yeas, 69; nay, 1......May 6, 1861 [The negative vote was cast by Dr. Isaac Murphy, afterwards (1864-68) governor.] Battle of Pea Ridge between Union and Confederate forces. March 6-7, 1862 Union troops under General Washburne occupy Helena......July 11, 1862 Battle of Prairie Grove. United States Gens. Francis J.ke Helena. Gen. B. M. Prentiss, with about 4,000 men, repulses them with heavy loss......July 4, 1863 Union forces occupy Little Rock......Sept. 10, 1863 Union State convention assembles to form a new constitution......Jan. 8, 1864 Dr. Isaac Murphy provisional governor; inaugurated......Jan. 22, 1864 Constitution ratified by vote of the people......March 14, 1864 [The legislature under this constitution is not recognized by Congress.] Arkansas and Mississippi formed into the 4
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
Here engaging in the practice of law he soon attained prominence, and in 1842 was elected to the legislature. At the beginning of the war he entered the Confederate service as captain of Company E of the second regiment of Arkansas mounted rifles, and in a short time was promoted colonel of the regiment. In this capacity he was serving when elected governor of the State at the special election held November 15, 1862. During the remainder of the Confederate period, until the election of Isaac Murphy, 1864, he held the position of chief executive, and during the darkest days for the cause maintained himself with fortitude and ability. After the close of the war he resumed his residence at Arkadelphia, and again engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1874 he was a member of the constitutional convention of the State. His death occurred October 23, 1874. John Milton John Milton, governor of Florida during the war, was born April 21, 1807, in Jefferson county, Ga. His fat
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